Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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Ike, Liked

Caught up in fears that the Democratic Party would fracture beyond repair without a unifying influence, enormously popular moderate Eisenhower allows himself to be drafted by a grassroots campaign. At the urging of Clare Booth Luce in an effort to take the wind out of Henry Wallace's sails, another surprising outsider is chosen to complete the ticket.
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1936

Long’s ambitious plans initially ran into the wall that was the United States Congress. But what Long had gotten through was enough to stand on, and he made the midterms a referendum on the Share Our Wealth Program, and was rewarded with more workable majorities. This terrified many conservative forces. An attempt at a coup was organized, the so-called Bullard Putsch. But the Putsch failed, and suddenly Long had a lot more leeway. Businesses were brought into line with the stick. Republicans and anti-Long Democrats everywhere were suddenly under intense supervision from J. Edgar Hoover and co.

Long was breezily renominated. The only question was how the replace his departed Vice President Royal Copeland. He selected Hugh Johnson, the aggressive administrator from Kansas, who had occasionally raised eyebrows with his admiration for Fascism in Europe. The Republicans had a raucous convention, filled with behind the scenes maneuvering that Long may or may not have been a part of. The end result was Robert Taft of Ohio (who won office earlier ITTL). Taft ran on a strictly Conservative Platform, a fact that was out of tune with a country that was liking the fact that Long was addressing the issues of the Depression. Taft was hit with several smears implying his involvement with the Bullard Putsch, although no charges were ever filed.

Long won in a historic landslide. Taft’s gains in the Heartland were more than offset by his collapse in the East. Long would have another 4 years to reshape America as he so willed it.


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The 1980 United States Senate election in Indiana took place on November 4, 1980, along with elections to the United States Senate in other states as well as the presidential election, elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Birch Bayh was re-elected to a fourth consecutive term in office, defeating the Republican nominee U.S. Representative Dan Quayle.
Birch Bayh, the incumbent Senator, faced no opposition from other Indiana Democrats and avoided a primary election. Bayh was originally elected in 1962 and then had been re-elected in 1968 and 1974. He was Chairman of Senate Intelligence Committee and primary architect of the 25th, 26th, 27th, and later the 28th amendments to the Constitution of the United States. This election was considered to be one of the key races in the country during the 1980 elections, but Bayh would go on win the election in the most substantial victory in his Senate career despite Republican George Bush's concurrent six-point victory in the state presidential contest.
 
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The 2020 US Presidential election was held on November 3 to select the next President of the United States. The election saw the defeat of incumbent Michael Bloomberg, who had narrowly won in 2016 on an anti-war platform following the turbulent years of the Chuck Hagel administration and unpopularity with the ‘Nebraska Dynasty’. Bloomberg’s centrist policies, including a weak response to the ongoing recession, made him extremely unpopular, and even replacing Hillary Clinton with progressive Warren couldn’t save his chances, although the Anti-Nebraskans still hoped to force a hung College and win in the House. The main opposition to the Anti-Nebraskans were the Know Nothings, led by Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts. While the governor’s selection at the Know Nothing Convention was heavily criticized as further perpetuating the Nebraska Dynasty, Ricketts ran on a promise to restrict immigration and loosen the economic regulations to promote business. Controversially, Ricketts also promised to ban immigration from Bermuda, Jamaica, Liberia, and other countries, widely seen as an attempt to attract moderate voters away from the Anti-Masonic party, under perennial candidate Pat Buchanan. Buchanan, for his part, blamed the country’s woes entirely on the Masons, and vowed a ‘purge of American society’ to rid the nation of Masonic influence. The other major party contesting the elections were the Nullifiers, whose primary aim was to secure a hung electoral college and through its concessions for greater state autonomy. The party was lead by rising star Ken Paxton, whose litigation with the federal government had earned him renown.

The final results surprised some, with Bloomberg narrowly carrying the popular vote over Ricketts, but vote-splitting and Ricketts’ hardline anti-immigrant stance won over many blue collar voters in the Rust Belt, as well as an upset win in California with less than 30% of the vote. Bloomberg performed poorly, winning only Anti-Nebraska strongholds. While many factors were involved, several commentators blamed Bloomberg’s personal targeting of Ricketts for being from Nebraska and the abolition of the state, despite being in the party’s platform since 1872, as too mean-spirited and personal. The Nullifiers won much of the south, but changing demographics in Georgia and record voter turnout in Louisiana following Operation Freedmen Freedom saw sufficient vote-splitting to cause the Nullifiers to lose, with much of the upper south defecting to the Know Nothings. With the results concluded, the nation prepares to inaugurate its first Know-Nothing president since Pete Wilson in 1996.
 

The 2020 US Presidential election was held on November 3 to select the next President of the United States. The election saw the defeat of incumbent Michael Bloomberg, who had narrowly won in 2016 on an anti-war platform following the turbulent years of the Chuck Hagel administration and unpopularity with the ‘Nebraska Dynasty’. Bloomberg’s centrist policies, including a weak response to the ongoing recession, made him extremely unpopular, and even replacing Hillary Clinton with progressive Warren couldn’t save his chances, although the Anti-Nebraskans still hoped to force a hung College and win in the House. The main opposition to the Anti-Nebraskans were the Know Nothings, led by Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts. While the governor’s selection at the Know Nothing Convention was heavily criticized as further perpetuating the Nebraska Dynasty, Ricketts ran on a promise to restrict immigration and loosen the economic regulations to promote business. Controversially, Ricketts also promised to ban immigration from Bermuda, Jamaica, Liberia, and other countries, widely seen as an attempt to attract moderate voters away from the Anti-Masonic party, under perennial candidate Pat Buchanan. Buchanan, for his part, blamed the country’s woes entirely on the Masons, and vowed a ‘purge of American society’ to rid the nation of Masonic influence. The other major party contesting the elections were the Nullifiers, whose primary aim was to secure a hung electoral college and through its concessions for greater state autonomy. The party was lead by rising star Ken Paxton, whose litigation with the federal government had earned him renown.

The final results surprised some, with Bloomberg narrowly carrying the popular vote over Ricketts, but vote-splitting and Ricketts’ hardline anti-immigrant stance won over many blue collar voters in the Rust Belt, as well as an upset win in California with less than 30% of the vote. Bloomberg performed poorly, winning only Anti-Nebraska strongholds. While many factors were involved, several commentators blamed Bloomberg’s personal targeting of Ricketts for being from Nebraska and the abolition of the state, despite being in the party’s platform since 1872, as too mean-spirited and personal. The Nullifiers won much of the south, but changing demographics in Georgia and record voter turnout in Louisiana following Operation Freedmen Freedom saw sufficient vote-splitting to cause the Nullifiers to lose, with much of the upper south defecting to the Know Nothings. With the results concluded, the nation prepares to inaugurate its first Know-Nothing president since Pete Wilson in 1996.
Hopefully Jerry Falwell was registered to vote outside of Virginia. Especially if the Constitution still forbids states from awarding Electoral College votes to a Presidential and Vice Presidential nominee from the same state.
 
Hopefully Jerry Falwell was registered to vote outside of Virginia. Especially if the Constitution still forbids states from awarding Electoral College votes to a Presidential and Vice Presidential nominee from the same state.

Technically it just requires electors from that state to vote for two different individuals. I didn't know he was in Virginia, I thought he was from New England. Oh well.
 
(part1 part2)
List of Senators by state
D: 44 R: 39 AIP: 16 C: 1
Alabama: John Sparkman (AIP) /James Allen (AIP)
Alaska: Ted Stevens (R) / Mike Gravel (D)
Arizona: Paul Fannin (R) / Barry Goldwater (R)
Arkansas: John Little McClellan (AIP) / J. William Fulbright (AIP)
California: John V. Tunney (D) / Alan Cranston (D)
Colorado: Floyd Haskell (D) / Peter H. Dominick (R)
Connecticut: Lowell P. Welcker Jr. (R) / Abraham Ribicoff (D)
Delaware: William Roth (R) / Joseph Biden (AIP)
Florida: Lawton Chiles (D) / Edward Gurney (R)
Georgia: Sam Nunn (D) / Herman Talmadge (D)
Hawaii: Hiram Fong (R) / Daniel Inouye (D)
Idaho: Leonard Jordan (R) / Frank Church (D)
Illinois: Adlai Stevenson III (D) /Charles H. Percy (R)
Indiana: Vance Hartke (D) / Birch Bayh (D)
Iowa: Dick Clark (D) / Harold Hughes (D)
Kansas: James B. Pearson (R) / Bob Dole (R)
Kentucky: Walter D. Huddleston (D) / Marlow Cook (R)
Louisiana: John McKeithen (AIP)/ Russell B. Long (AIP)
Maine: Edmund Muskie (D) / William Hathaway (D)
Maryland: Joseph Tydings (D) / Charles Mathias (R)
Massasuchets: Ted Kennedy (D) / Edward Brooke (R)
Michigan: Philip Hart (D) / Robert Griffin (R)
Montana: Clark MacGregor (R) / Lee Metcalf (D)
Missisipi: John C. Stennis (AIP) / James Eastland (AIP)
Missouri: Stuart Symington (D) / Thomas Eagleton (AIP)
Montana: Mike Mansfield (D) -/ Lee Metcalf (D)
Nebraska: Roman Hruska (R) / Carl Curtis (R)
Nevada: Howard Cannon (D) / Alan Bible (D)
New Hampshire: Thomas J. McIntyre (D) / Norris Cotton (R)
New Jersey: Harrison A. Williams (D) / Clifford P. Case (R)
New Mexico: Joseph Montoya (D) / Pete Domenici (R)
New York: James L. Buckley (C) / Jacob Javits (R)
North Carolina: B. Everret Jordan (AIP) / Sam Ervin (AIP)
North Dakota: Quentin Burdick (D) / Milton Young (R)
Ohio: John Glenn (D) / Robert Taft Jr. (R)
Oklahoma: Fred R. Harris (D) / Henry Bellmon (R)
Oregon: Mark Hatfield (R) / Bob Packwood (R)
Pennsylvania: Hugh Scott (R) / Richard Schweiker (R)
Rhode Island: John Pastore (D) / Claiborne Pell (D)
South Carolina: Storm Thurmond (AIP) / Fritz Hollings (AIP)
South Dakota: James Abourezk (D) / George McGovern (D)
Tennessee: Albert Gore Sr. (D) / Howard Baker (R)
Texas: Lloyd Bentsen (AIP) / John Tower (R)
Utah: Frank Moss (D) / Wallace F. Bennett (R)
Vermont: Robert Stafford (R) / George Aikken (R)
Virginia: Harry F. Byrd Jr. (AIP) / William L. Scott (R)
Washington: Henry M. Jackson (D) / Warren Magnuson (D)
West Virginia: Robert C. Byrd (AIP) / Jennings Randolph (D)
Wisconsin: William Proxmire (D) / Gaylord Nelson (D)
Wyoming: Gale W. McGee (D) / Clifford Hansen (R)
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(fixed because i forgot how election law works)
 
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The 2020 US Presidential election was held on November 3 to select the next President of the United States. The election saw the defeat of incumbent Michael Bloomberg, who had narrowly won in 2016 on an anti-war platform following the turbulent years of the Chuck Hagel administration and unpopularity with the ‘Nebraska Dynasty’. Bloomberg’s centrist policies, including a weak response to the ongoing recession, made him extremely unpopular, and even replacing Hillary Clinton with progressive Warren couldn’t save his chances, although the Anti-Nebraskans still hoped to force a hung College and win in the House. The main opposition to the Anti-Nebraskans were the Know Nothings, led by Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts. While the governor’s selection at the Know Nothing Convention was heavily criticized as further perpetuating the Nebraska Dynasty, Ricketts ran on a promise to restrict immigration and loosen the economic regulations to promote business. Controversially, Ricketts also promised to ban immigration from Bermuda, Jamaica, Liberia, and other countries, widely seen as an attempt to attract moderate voters away from the Anti-Masonic party, under perennial candidate Pat Buchanan. Buchanan, for his part, blamed the country’s woes entirely on the Masons, and vowed a ‘purge of American society’ to rid the nation of Masonic influence. The other major party contesting the elections were the Nullifiers, whose primary aim was to secure a hung electoral college and through its concessions for greater state autonomy. The party was lead by rising star Ken Paxton, whose litigation with the federal government had earned him renown.

The final results surprised some, with Bloomberg narrowly carrying the popular vote over Ricketts, but vote-splitting and Ricketts’ hardline anti-immigrant stance won over many blue collar voters in the Rust Belt, as well as an upset win in California with less than 30% of the vote. Bloomberg performed poorly, winning only Anti-Nebraska strongholds. While many factors were involved, several commentators blamed Bloomberg’s personal targeting of Ricketts for being from Nebraska and the abolition of the state, despite being in the party’s platform since 1872, as too mean-spirited and personal. The Nullifiers won much of the south, but changing demographics in Georgia and record voter turnout in Louisiana following Operation Freedmen Freedom saw sufficient vote-splitting to cause the Nullifiers to lose, with much of the upper south defecting to the Know Nothings. With the results concluded, the nation prepares to inaugurate its first Know-Nothing president since Pete Wilson in 1996.
isnt this current poltics
 

AHE

Gone Fishin'
isnt this current poltics
No. The political situation is radically different. Current politics wikiboxes is like...alternate outcomes of relatively recent and polarizing political events with ”minor changes” to the political landscape. For example, a 2016 electoral wikibox where “wholesome 100 Hillary” defeats “satan Trump” is current politics, but a 2016-20 electoral wikibox series where Pat Buchanan pulls off a electoral upset for the Know Nothing Party and then proceeds to get his shit kicked in during his term by a Labor-controlled House/Senate isn’t.

I actually want to make a wikibox scenario for that now smh
 

Nice! I have two nitpicks here. First, the contingent election would be on 6 January, unless this is a TL where the 20th amendment isn't passed. Second, unless the 12th amendment is different, the vice presidential contingent election would be between Muskie and Connally, with Rockefeller not eligible. I'm also curious as to how McGovern got a solid majority in the contingent election when Congress is so split. The graphics are very good though!
 
Nice! I have two nitpicks here. First, the contingent election would be on 6 January, unless this is a TL where the 20th amendment isn't passed. Second, unless the 12th amendment is different, the vice presidential contingent election would be between Muskie and Connally, with Rockefeller not eligible. I'm also curious as to how McGovern got a solid majority in the contingent election when Congress is so split. The graphics are very good though!
i didnt know about the date, i assumed they would vote when they first convene
also Connally was shown as getting the 2nd place because it was the last ballot (previous didnt get absolute majority of votes) - if Connally then didn't qualify because of only two first contenders being voted on it would nonetheless not change results (as it was agreed that Rockefeller would be choosen as VP in exchange for Republicans supporting McGovern)
 
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