Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

Hi everyone, just want to invite you all to check out the inaugural round of the Wikibox Contest. This round's theme is "Landslide" and it'll be a two-week contest. Feel free to chat in the discussion thread and submit an entry!
 
1928

The economy’s collapse in late 1929 would have hurt any President of any party. But Ritchie’s steadfast refusal to do something, anything, about the Depression doomed him and the Democratic Party to defeat. The Ritchievilles set up across the nation promised that. He managed to fight off a challenge from Wheeler at the Convention, but Wheeler simply walked out and refounded the Progressive Party.

The Republican Convention saw Conservatives and Progressives scrambling over one another for the chance to run, which resulted in another deadlocked convention, ripe for a dark horse. Freshman Senator, and former journalist, Arthur Vandenberg wound up the nominee despite his relative youth and inexperience. William Borah walked out and joined Wheeler, but the rest rallied behind Vandenberg and his clever choice of a Roosevelt.

The result is never really in doubt. Ritchie is hated. Vandenberg is new. The western bent of the Progressive ticket dooms it, and it winds up unable to carry even a single state. The Upper South, Texas and Florida also collapse into the GOP fold, stunning those who had considered them safe votes for even the most disgraced Democrat.

As Inauguration Day neared the country wondered. Could Vandenberg save the country?

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Cross-posting my entry for the Wikibox contest:
Two Landslides
1991 USAR election.png
The Union of Socialist American Republics had a curious electoral system. On every November 3rd, every citizen who was eligible to vote went to the polls in their county to select the members of their Executive Council. The Executive Councils were inaugurated one week later, once the results were tabulated. The ECs then selected the members of the People’s State Congresses, the bodies that governed the fifty-one states in the Socialist Union. After one week to inaugurate the new members, the People’s State Congresses voted on how to allocate the delegates each state had (calculated by adding the number of National Councilmen to the number of members of the Tribunate). The nature of the USAR’s elections allowed one party to win a bare majority of delegates with less than thirty percent of the popular vote. Of course, of the twelve elections in Union history, eleven saw the winning candidate for First Secretary also win the popular vote. Those who suggested that someone could take advantage of the peculiarities of the system were largely derided, and the byzantine system lumbered forward into the future.
Then came the presidential election of 1991, where the people, councils, and congresses once more went to select the next leader of the ‘Free World’.
Conditions were ripe for someone new, an outsider, even, potentially someone not a card-carrying member of the Communist Party, to win the First Secretaryship. The economy was poor as the inefficient and increasingly corrupt industrial syndicates began to decline, with high wages and benefits forcing the syndicates to borrow larger and larger sums of money as production and profits declined. The rate of decline had accelerated since 1985, as Chinese steel production became more efficient and more high quality, while Socialist Union production stagnated and quality declined.
First Secretary George H.W. Bush, previously the Director of the Public Safety Bureau and the Commissar of East Texas, had been unable to prevent or mitigate this decline. It wasn’t just steel, either - automobile production and agricultural output had declined significantly, causing food shortages and further economic woes for the stumbling Union economy. Despite price controls and massive financial incentives and subsidies, Detroit kept putting out less and less automobiles, the Plains States were hit with a drought brought on by the depletion of natural aquifers, and Pittsburgh and Birmingham saw steel production fall to below 1969 levels.
The stagnation of the 1980s had given way to bread riots, oil riots, strikes, public protests, and the like. The intervention in Mexico dragged on, while food and fuel became scarce at home. In 1990, blackouts shutdown the entire industrial midwest and north-east, bringing production to a crashing halt. An especially poor harvest that year led to starving residents in Minneapolis storming government warehouses, followed by a general massacre perpetrated by the PSB.
Into this atmosphere of chaos, fear, and loathing stepped Arkansas Commissar Bill Blythe. Blythe had been the Chairman of the Little Rock Executive Committee before his election, and was a phenomenally popular reformist in both his state and around the nation. In 1990, after the Minneapolis Massacre, Blythe left the Communist Party and founded the Reform Party. Soon after, in a move that surprised absolutely no one, Blythe announced his intent to challenge First Secretary Bush for the position in the 1991 elections.
Blythe’s candidacy was the worst possible thing to happen to the Communist politburo. A popular, charismatic politician, an outsider, promising reform and telling the people of the Socialist Union “I feel your pain!”. Extraordinary measures had to be taken to preserve the Communist system. And so phone calls were made.
On election day, more than seventy million Americans went out and voted. Turnout rose nineteen percent, to 75%, the highest since before the Revolution. Blythe predictably won a landslide victory, with a record-breaking 71 million votes in his favor, or 66% of the total votes cast, even sweeping the heavily-Communist 'Black Belt' states and industrial Michigan and Washington.And yet, when the People’s State Congresses convened in early December, there was a shocking result. Despite having the support of just 25% of the country, George H.W. Bush had won 425 delegates from the PSCs, 299 more than Blythe.
Protests and riots broke out almost immediately, with shops and cars smashed, and PSB officers lynched in the streets. In 1994, with the economy collapsing and the Union careening towards civil war, First Secretary Bush made a televised address announcing the dissolution of the USAR. a provisional government soon elected Bill Blythe as the new First Secretary, ushering in the National Reform era. And so, the Union of Socialist American Republics died as it was born, in the forge of Revolution...
 
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THE FOOTITE CONSENSUS

If you told someone in 1981 that Michael Foot would win the 1983 Election in a landslide, they would call you crazy. However, events transpired in a way so cataclysmic for the Conservatives that it ended up making Michael Foot the longest serving Prime Minister of the 21st Century. The failure of the Conservative government to take back the Falklands, the persistence of Prime Minister Thatcher to call a general election four years into the term, when an election could have been called as late as 1984, and the manifesto pledge from Foot in the election to return the Falklands to British stewardship all mixed to create a cocktail of mortal proportions for the chances of the Conservatives winning the election. That, and the Labour Party, which once seemed destined to splinter, stayed completely together.

In the end, Michael Foot won over four hundred seats, the first time this had occured since the 1930s, and won the largest popular vote percentage since the 1951 election. The popular vote total was a new record. For the first time in history, the sitting Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, lost her Finchley seat to the Labour candidate, Lawrence Spiegel. Several Conservative frontbenchers and backbenchers alike were felled in the landslide, including several potential leadership contenders. Margaret Thatcher had a shocked look on her face when she realised that she had lost her seat, and the country, by such a large margin. Thatcher made one last speech in front of the press at Downing Street, before heading into the Prime Ministerial car, with a tear in her eye, to hand in her resignation to the Queen and recommend her to send for Michael Foot. Naturally, the Queen accepted Thatcher's resignation, and she then invited Michael Foot to form a new government, which he accepted.

The new Prime Minister then headed to Downing Street where he made a speech thanking the public for their strong vote of confidence in him, and then headed off inside, with his wife Jill by her side. The oldest Prime Minister since Winston Churchill; he turned 70 next month, started forming his new cabinet, which was almost entirely the same as the Shadow Cabinet. Peter Shore was made Chancellor of the Exchequer. Roy Hattersley was made Home Secretary. Denis Healey was made Foreign Secretary. John Silkin was made Defence Secretary and Leader of the House of Commons, John Smith was made Secretary of State for Energy, while Neil Kinnock was made Science and Education Secretary. Left wing firebrand Tony Benn was made Minister without Portfolio, though rumours were that he was to be given a promotion to the Foreign Office soon enough. Whatever the matters, the government had a strong mandate to fulfill their manifesto, and shape Britain in their image.

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Here's some more elections.

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President Butler had hoped to leave at least a portion of the world "In tact." In spite of what the supposed capitalists and merchants of death screamed at him via lobbying interests, he refused to budge. America seemed to be enjoying it's isolation from the affairs of Europe and whatever mad men marched their troops which way. However, John Bull was not happy. The United Kingdom demanded some sort of aid to their war effort. The sheer amount of political lobbying at Butler's doorstep was enough to make his blood boil. The President hadn't been wounded several times during the First Everglades Conflict just to watch American boys die off into some other war. He gave the british an ultimatum to piss off. Because of this, the American Navy, save for patrols to the Island of California-Nevada, sat dormant.

This didn't sit well with those foes that he had been battling. The large industrialists. In the upcoming election, they needed to get rid of the Whigs. No, they needed to obliterate them. Wipe them out. So the large tycoonists began to shop around in the Whig field for some sort of challenger to Butler's purported "third term" aspirations. Radio ads were already bankrolled that condemned the "Betrayal of the sacred rule of two that the great President Aaron Burr had carefully constructed." However, it was mostly a political game. Eventually, Smedley gave it some thought with his family, who were worried about his Portuguese-American war injuries acting up. They were able to convince him against breaking "Burr's Rule". He would not run for a third term "at this time."

This left open the floodgates at the Whig Party convention.

Given the Whig party's general dominance since the days of Andrew Johnson and Hamilton Fish, there had only been a single Democratic President (Iowa's Horace Boies in 1896). Garnering the Whig Party's nomination was seen as tantamount to election. While it wasn't a one party state by any means, (Certainly was more democratic than the much hated authoritative Columbian dictatorship of the early 19th century.) American voters had still picked the Whig Party 15 times out of 17 since 1852. The Whig Party, as a result of their long term dominance over the White House, divided into distinct factions. The largest was the mainstream conservative, pro business faction that had all but shuddered out with Butler's stern rejection of their "war profiteering". Local businessman Henry Ford and Ohio native Warren G. Harding were members.
The smaller faction of reformers was headed by former Admiral George Dewey and prominent white women's rights activist Rebecca Felton. Felton's support came from the white women of mostly Georgia and South Carolina, in firm opposition to the party machinery that remained in the hands of House Speaker Champ Clark from Missouri.
While Ford was more combative of his claims, his support fizzled out after eight ballots. Reluctantly backing Mr. Gamaliel, the Ohioan was proclaimed "America's guy" on the fifteenth ballot. Wisconsin Senator Irvine Lenroot was selected after 81 ballots as the Vice Presidential nominee.

As there seemed to have little hope in the general election for a Democrat to win the White House, the overall political infrastructure for a Democratic run was barebones. Apart from loyal county and state heads within the South, there was little capital for such a run. However, there seemed to be a discontent within various voting bases, a seething anger from the aggressive way that Butler and the both the Department of Moral Preservation, Department of Temperance Enforcement and Department of Alcoholic Enforcement handled such matters. The way Butler's "goons" aggressively shut down numerous illegal speakeasies and openly arrested those known to have sold alcohol in violation of the Prohibition Act of 1919 drew criticism from those that just wanted a drink. A series of harsh famines throughout the South, spurred on by a demand to grow cotton in lieu of wheat and a lackluster supply chain from north to south (left over from animosity of reconstruction) eroded the once rock solid support that the Whig party had gotten from the Southern Belt. This proved an opportunity for the Democrats. After 11 ballots, Mississippian John Williams was tentatively declared as their presidential champion. Incumbent Texas Senator James McReynolds was picked by Williams as his running mate.

Adopting a Front-Porch campaign, William's campaign was run on his Cedar Grove plantation home, with him receiving visitors and explaining his positions on various issues to anyone that had happened to stop by. The Campaign quickly seized on these talks and slammed Warren Harding as "out of touch and inexperienced", showcasing the long two senate terms with John Sharp and contrasting Harding's relatively new political footing on the national stage. Their campaign asked a simple question: "Would you vote for the man whom you have heard about, and trust? Or would you vote for an unknown entity with the coattails (and baggage) of the former leader."
Harding, for his part, crisscrossed the nation, taking numerous boats and sailing to the Port City of Las Vegas, giving various speeches in the sparsely populated states. Armed with the Whig Party's formidable war chest, he tasked the allocation of such funds to political allies and cronies such as Albert B. Fall and Harry Daugherty. This worked out about as well as having foxes guard the chicken coop. Within a few weeks he was forced to fire them from the campaign when both men were convicted of taking massive bribes the week before the election. Fall had been in talks to buy up the Navy's oil reserves in Nebraska and Illinois, and was caught by an undercover agent of the aforementioned DAE, which also acted as a federal investigative agency.

While Williams kept the conversation polite, his numerous surrogates within the newspapers slandered many within the Whig Party, though they were hammering the "dictatorial style" of President Butler. When Butler would suppress and censor these reports, it alienated those that had previously backed the Whigs. The more damaging was the fallout of the Fall Naval Scandal, which revealed sweeping corruption within the Butler Administration on a large scale for the first time. Despite the efforts of Whig party bosses and newspaper henchmen of Butler to suppress the news, it leaked out and spread like wildfire.
In the end, Williams exceeded many of the conservative estimates, winning the electoral college by almost one hundred more than Harding.
Come election night, telegraphs of congratulations poured over the country for John Sharp, reminding him of victorious aftermath of his bitterly contested Democratic senate primary with Governor Vardaman in 1908.
 
Does anyone know what good scientific names I could use for some cryptids? I have a few infoboxes that I want to make but haven't been able to do so because I don't know some good scientific names. These animals include

* Bigfoot/Sasquatch
* Yeti/Abominable Snowman
* Yowie
* Gremlin

I also want to make an infobox for the fearsome critter known as the agropelter, which is an ape with the scientific name Anthrocephalus craniofractens. However, when I tried to add the scientific name, the infobox got screwed up. Could I also have help with that problem?
 
Does anyone know what good scientific names I could use for some cryptids? I have a few infoboxes that I want to make but haven't been able to do so because I don't know some good scientific names. These animals include

* Bigfoot/Sasquatch
* Yeti/Abominable Snowman
* Yowie
* Gremlin

I also want to make an infobox for the fearsome critter known as the agropelter, which is an ape with the scientific name Anthrocephalus craniofractens. However, when I tried to add the scientific name, the infobox got screwed up. Could I also have help with that problem?
For the former, it depends on where you want to put them taxonomically - are they part of their own genuses or not? Are they primates or something else?

For the latter, can you post the infobox code here?
 
Does anyone know what good scientific names I could use for some cryptids? I have a few infoboxes that I want to make but haven't been able to do so because I don't know some good scientific names. These animals include

* Bigfoot/Sasquatch
* Yeti/Abominable Snowman
* Yowie
* Gremlin

I also want to make an infobox for the fearsome critter known as the agropelter, which is an ape with the scientific name Anthrocephalus craniofractens. However, when I tried to add the scientific name, the infobox got screwed up. Could I also have help with that problem?
I'd say for the first three some sort of descendent of gigantopithecus would work.
 
For the former, it depends on where you want to put them taxonomically - are they part of their own genuses or not? Are they primates or something else?

For the latter, can you post the infobox code here?
Of course Sasquatch, Yeti and Yowie are going to be primates (apes specifically), Wolfram. That's how they're always portrayed in popular culture. For they're genuses, though, I heard that Sasquatch is in the Hominidae (hominids) family and like the Orangutan and the extinct Gigantopithecus, it is part of the Ponginae subfamily.

As for the Gremlin, some people say it part of the family of lesser primates (strepsirrhines), you know, animals such as lemurs, galagos, and lorisids.

As for the infobox coding for the agropelter, here you go:

{{Speciesbox
| name = Agropelter
| status = CR
| status_system = IUCN3.1
| status_ref = <ref name="IUCN-2016">{{cite iucn |title=''Pongo pygmaeus'' |author1=Ancrenaz, M. |author2=Gumal, M. |author3=Marshall, A. |author4=Meijaard, E. |author5=Wich, S.A. |author6=Hussons, S.J. |name-list-style=amp |page=e.T17975A17966347 |year=2016}}</ref>
| image = Agropelter.jpg
| image_caption = An illustration of an agropelter about to throw a large stick at a logger.
| taxon = Anthrocephalus craniofractens
| authority = ([[Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods, With a Few Desert and Mountain Beasts|Cox]], 1910)
| range_map =
| range_map_caption =
| synonyms =
}}

I'd say for the first three some sort of descendent of gigantopithecus would work.
Alright Back in the USSA, time for me to answer your suggestion.

Hmm, Gigantopithecus sasquatch, Gigantopithecus yeti and Gigantopithecus yowie? I guess that might work. I'll give it a shot and see what happens. Thanks for the suggestion! :)
 
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