Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VI (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

The Golden Age, Part II

May or may not do text parts later.
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President Bill Clinton had just won reelection. The economy was thriving. The Cold War was over. Truly, Americans had never had it so good.

Then it was all tragically cut short.

President Clinton and the First Lady had arrived in Manila ahead of the 1996 APEC summit. There were several security concerns ahead of the meeting. A bomb had been found mere days before near the summit site, and the State Department issued a security alert for U.S. citizens in the Philippines. Very little attention, however, was given.

It was early in the evening when the report came for most Americans. The first reports of an explosion and a bridge collapse near the APEC meeting site dominated the cable news channels. What followed was what seemed like a very long period of uncertainty. A sudden string of breaking news alerts followed the situation in Manila, but nothing was clear. Was the president involved? Was the president safe? Are there any casualties? Will the APEC summit still go ahead? Until, at around 8:00pm, EST, the official confirmation came through.

"We have now received the official confirmation from Manila: President William Jefferson Clinton, and First Lady Hillary Clinton, died today at 18:30, Eastern Standard Time, 7:30 AM Philippine Time. He was 50, she was 49. Vice President Gore, presumably, will be taking the oath of office to become the 43rd president." - Dan Rather, CBS News

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"I, Albert Arnold Gore, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. So help me God." - Al Gore​

After a chaotic situation between Manila and Washington, President Gore sat in the White House's situation room, the most powerful office in the world thrust upon him. An investigation would be ordered immediately, but it didn't take long for the perpetrators to emerge. No group had claimed responsibility yet, but CIA director John Deutch told the president that intelligence determined that the assassination was masterminded by Saudi terrorist Osama bin Laden, leader of the Islamist terror group al-Qaeda. Mere months before, bin Laden had declared a 'holy war' against the United States. Now, he had struck at the head of the U.S. government.

It was a day that shook the world. The news talked of the act of war; a new day of infamy. The frontpage of The New York Times was simply a picture of President Clinton and the First Lady below President Gore's words: "We, as a nation, have bore witness to an unspeakable tragedy. This act of terror was intended to sow chaos in our nation and our government. They did not, and will never, succeed." The assassination had a rather significant impact on entertainment media, with several films being edited. The upcoming film Mars Attacks! was postponed due to a scene showing the death of a fictionalized U.S. president portrayed by Jack Nicholson. The entire nation was in a state of shock, and some anger.

With a monumental task ahead of him, President Gore had to unify the country. The main task was preparing to bring those responsible to justice, and that's what the President vowed to do with the duty bestowed upon him. However, there was still one large hurdle to overcome. A constitutional crisis in the making. President Clinton had been reelected, but he had not been elected by the Electoral College yet.

It was assumed that most Democratic electors would switch their vote to Gore, but that was easier said than done. Some state laws limited the ability of electors to change their vote, and already the court battles were beginning. The last time a presidential candidate died between election day and the electoral college vote was 1872, when losing candidate Horace Greeley died and his electoral votes were scattered among different candidates. Clinton, of course, was no Greeley. The fact that Clinton was an incumbent only made things worse. Inevitably, partisan politics quickly made a return.

Once the nation was over the initial shock, the White House looked for a suitable Vice President to replace Gore on the ticket. A shortlist was released in December, ranging of candidates from congress, governor's mansions, even the military. Even Republicans appeared on this list, including Bob Dole, the man Clinton had defeated only a month ago. But time was running out. Former Clinton campaign representatives were now embroiled in a Supreme Court battle over the legality of electors breaking their pledges. Speaker Newt Gingrich was even advised on the potential of his own succession to the presidency should the electoral college vote be invalidated. Eventually, most electors were allowed to change their vote without penalty, owing to the unique circumstances. The states, ultimately, could not bind electors to a deceased candidate. With the decision, the White House had finally announced Dick Gephardt as Gore's Vice Presidential choice, with only a couple days to spare. Regardless, some electors had interpreted the long wait differently and were publicly supporting other shortlist candidates. It seemed inevitable the Vice Presidential vote was bound for pandemonium.

Gore and Gephardt were now, officially, president-elect and VP-elect. The results were certified by president pro tempore Strom Thurmond in a joint session of congress. Sure, there were a lot of faithless electors that voted against this days old ticket, be it for a variety of reasons: an act of protest against the electoral college or even against the ticket itself. In this situation, it was bound to happen. Luckily for the country, the new Gore-Gephardt ticket had far more than a majority, as expected with the crisis facing America.

With the President receiving authorization for use of military force from Congress, it was clear what was next. Osama bin Laden was now the U.S.'s most wanted fugitive. A man not just responsible for the deaths of the president and first lady, but also the deaths of many hundreds of civilians throughout the world. U.S. intelligence had even seen reason to link him to the 1993 World Trade Center bombings. With the stroke of a pen, President Gore had authorized the arrest or assassination of bin Laden.

But the American people demanded answers. Why was security not sufficient enough? Impassioned speeches by senators and representatives urged the need for a quick and rightful response. Previously viewed as alarmists, the CIA's Bin Laden Unit was finally achieving results. Thanks to the defection of al-Qaeda militant Jamal al-Fadl, the CIA had a full map of al-Qaeda's reach and intentions throughout the globe. As for the whereabouts of bin Laden, he was able to flee from his base in Sudan to Afghanistan, now under Taliban rule and quickly becoming a terrorist safe haven. This was despite U.S. pressure on the Sudanese government to hand him over, before President Clinton's assassination. The Taliban had captured Kabul earlier in the year, proclaiming their 'Islamic Emirate', a mostly unrecognized state. Having explored all options, including a risky CIA plan to capture the al-Qaeda leader, President Gore issued a simple ultimatum to the Taliban: surrender bin Laden and his associates, expel al-Qaeda, or we will have no choice but to seek justice ourselves. The Taliban, predictably, refused.


In January 1997, after applying pressure to Pakistan and other Taliban supporters in the Afghanistan region, the United States initiated Operation Shining Light. President Gore announced the commencement of operations in Afghanistan in an Oval Office address to the nation. In the coming months, President Gore would also announce the creation of a joint Philippine-U.S. task force to combat Islamist forces stationed in the country, such as al-Qaeda and Abu Sayyaf. President Clinton's assassination has certainly changed the course of U.S. history. Political pundits are already referring to the new U.S. military campaigns as a 'war on terrorism', a term the administration discourages.
Your infoboxes are great, Duncanl! :cool:

I bet that when this thread eventually closes, your post might make it to be one of the Top 15 most liked.
 
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Thank you to the user Intergalactic for helping me out with this.

This is from my John McCain 2008 timeline that is on my signature called “The Miracle Man” and it not only cover stuff in the political world but what sports and entertainment is like in this timeline.
 
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Thank you to the user Intergalactic for helping me out with this.

This is from my John McCain 2008 timeline that is on my signature called “The Miracle Man” and it not only cover stuff in the political world but what sports and entertainment is like in this timeline.
I'm not sure Dole would be the best VP for McCain. As I remember 2008 there was concern over McCain's age and picking someone older than him probably would not help things.

As bad as Palin was, she certainly had energy.
 
A repentant George Wallace on his death bed is ISOT'd into his 1958 self, with only one goal in mind: redemption.
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George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and a vocal civil rights activist from 1958 until his death in 1998. He is best remembered for his use of populism in an attempt to get poor southern whites on the side of Civil Rights (whether he really succeeded or not, is still relatively debated today), his support for the spread of AFL-CIO influence in the south, and for his advocacy for use of non-violence in protest, inspired by his Christian beliefs. Wallace worked with various Civil Rights leaders, mainly Martin Luther King Jr. and Myles Horton. Wallace also participated in marches for desegregation, the abolition of poll taxes, labor rights, and other basic civil rights.

Born in Clio, Alabama, Wallace attended the University of Alabama School of Law and served in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war, he won election to the Alabama House of Representatives and served as a state judge. Wallace sought the Democratic nomination in the 1958 Alabama gubernatorial election. Initially a moderate on racial issues, Wallace adopted a hard-line integrationist stance after losing the 1958 nomination. Wallace would later be quoted when asked if he would ever run for Governor again he simply responded by saying "Maybe in another life, but I have more important things to attend to". He gained national notoriety when he held a speech outside the University of Alabama that attacked Governor Bull Connor for his resistance to integration and for his brutal treatment of African-Americans who protested.

Wallace supported Lyndon Johnson as President, which initially baffled fellow Civil Rights activists, but later paid off when LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, though he would renounce his support when the President intervened in the Vietnam War. Also at this time, Wallace would help organize one of the three Selma to Montgomery marches. In the late 1960s, Wallace would shift his opposition to other issues as well, like poverty, as mentioned before, the Vietnam War, and really any forms of violence. In 1968 while meeting with MLK, white-supremacist James Earl Ray shot Wallace (though he intended to shoot King). The assassination attempt would leave Wallace paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life. Wallace is credited with saving the life of King.

Wallace would retire to his homestead in 1980, ending his campaigning. Though he would continue to be outspoken in his views. After his retirement, Wallace befriended Reverend Jesse Jackson and would endorse the man when he ran for President. However, Wallace grew increasingly more conservative in his voting patterns and said in the last interview before his death, that he had voted for Bob Dole, stating "He's a good man. His wife is a born-again Christian woman and I believe he is, too." In the last years of his life, Wallace suffered from deafness and Parkinson's disease. Wallace would pass away on September 13, 1998. Even as of today, he is hailed as a Civil Rights hero.

 
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eadmund

Banned
A repentant George Wallace on his death bed is ISOT'd into his 1958 self, with only one goal in mind: redemption.
View attachment 604886
George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and a vocal civil rights activist from 1958 until his death in 1998. He is best remembered for his use of populism in an attempt to get poor southern whites on the side of Civil Rights (whether he really succeeded or not, is still relatively debated today), his support for the spread of AFL-CIO influence in the south, and for his advocacy for use of non-violence in protest, inspired by his Christian beliefs. Wallace worked with various Civil Rights leaders, mainly Martin Luther King Jr. and Myles Horton. Wallace also participated in marches for desegregation, the abolition of poll taxes, labor rights, and other basic civil rights.

Born in Clio, Alabama, Wallace attended the University of Alabama School of Law and served in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war, he won election to the Alabama House of Representatives and served as a state judge. Wallace sought the Democratic nomination in the 1958 Alabama gubernatorial election. Initially a moderate on racial issues, Wallace adopted a hard-line integrationist stance after losing the 1958 nomination. Wallace would later be quoted when asked if he would ever run for Governor again he simply responded by saying "Maybe in another life, but I have more important things to attend to". He gained national notoriety when he held a speech outside the University of Alabama that attacked Governor Bull Connor for his resistance to integration and for his brutal treatment of African-Americans who protested.

Wallace endorsed Lyndon Johnson for President, which initially baffled fellow Civil Rights activists, but later paid off when LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, though he would renounce his support when the President intervened in the Vietnam War. Also at this time, Wallace would help organize one of the three Selma to Montgomery marches. In the late 1960s, Wallace would shift his opposition to other issues as well, like poverty, as mentioned before, the Vietnam War, and really any forms of violence. In 1972 while meeting with MLK, white-supremacist James Earl Ray Jr. shot Wallace (though he intended to decided to kill King). The assassination attempt would leave Wallace paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life.

Wallace would retire to his homestead in 1980, ending his campaigning. Though he would continue to be outspoken in his views. After his retirement, Wallace befriended Reverend Jesse Jackson and would endorse the man when he ran for President. However, Wallace grew increasingly more conservative in his voting patterns and said in the last interview before his death, that he had voted for Bob Dole, stating "He's a good man. His wife is a born-again Christian woman and I believe he is, too." In the last years of his life, Wallace suffered from deafness and Parkinson's disease. Wallace would pass away on September 13, 1998. Even as of today, he is hailed as a Civil Rights hero.

Given the circumstances surrounding her death IOTL it's unlikely that Lurleen Wallace would die ITTL.
 
A repentant George Wallace on his death bed is ISOT'd into his 1958 self, with only one goal in mind: redemption.
View attachment 604987
George Corley Wallace Jr. (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives and a vocal civil rights activist from 1958 until his death in 1998. He is best remembered for his use of populism in an attempt to get poor southern whites on the side of Civil Rights (whether he really succeeded or not, is still relatively debated today), his support for the spread of AFL-CIO influence in the south, and for his advocacy for use of non-violence in protest, inspired by his Christian beliefs. Wallace worked with various Civil Rights leaders, mainly Martin Luther King Jr. and Myles Horton. Wallace also participated in marches for desegregation, the abolition of poll taxes, labor rights, and other basic civil rights.

Born in Clio, Alabama, Wallace attended the University of Alabama School of Law and served in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. After the war, he won election to the Alabama House of Representatives and served as a state judge. Wallace sought the Democratic nomination in the 1958 Alabama gubernatorial election. Initially a moderate on racial issues, Wallace adopted a hard-line integrationist stance after losing the 1958 nomination. Wallace would later be quoted when asked if he would ever run for Governor again he simply responded by saying "Maybe in another life, but I have more important things to attend to". He gained national notoriety when he held a speech outside the University of Alabama that attacked Governor Bull Connor for his resistance to integration and for his brutal treatment of African-Americans who protested.

Wallace endorsed Lyndon Johnson for President, which initially baffled fellow Civil Rights activists, but later paid off when LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, though he would renounce his support when the President intervened in the Vietnam War. Also at this time, Wallace would help organize one of the three Selma to Montgomery marches. In the late 1960s, Wallace would shift his opposition to other issues as well, like poverty, as mentioned before, the Vietnam War, and really any forms of violence. In 1968 while meeting with MLK, white-supremacist James Earl Ray shot Wallace (though he intended to shoot King). The assassination attempt would leave Wallace paralyzed from the waist down for the rest of his life. Wallace is credited with saving the life of King.

Wallace would retire to his homestead in 1980, ending his campaigning. Though he would continue to be outspoken in his views. After his retirement, Wallace befriended Reverend Jesse Jackson and would endorse the man when he ran for President. However, Wallace grew increasingly more conservative in his voting patterns and said in the last interview before his death, that he had voted for Bob Dole, stating "He's a good man. His wife is a born-again Christian woman and I believe he is, too." In the last years of his life, Wallace suffered from deafness and Parkinson's disease. Wallace would pass away on September 13, 1998. Even as of today, he is hailed as a Civil Rights hero.

I enjoyed your infobox, The Nixonator!

I do wonder though, with George Wallace now being pro-Civil Rights, I wonder what segregationist will take his place to run against Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 US presidential election. Who do you think it could be?
 
I enjoyed your infobox, The Nixonator!

I do wonder though, with George Wallace now being pro-Civil Rights, I wonder what segregationist will take his place to run against Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 US presidential election. Who do you think it could be?
Thanks!

Well, I was thinking of either Governor Happy Chandler or Bull Connor (as he is Governor of Alabama instead of Wallace) being the candidate there.
 
I decided to do a Wikibox of the Shanghai state in the unfinished map cover to The New Era.

A few notes:
1. Shanghai and Zånhae are interchangeable in most circumstances. As a result the emblem retains the name Shanghai.
2. Lin-Lu refers to Lin Yutang and Lu Xun (Zhou Shuren) respectively. In this timeline they created the foundations of the Romanizations of Minnan, Mindong, Minbei, Oujiang, and Taihu Wu languages, and the transliteration system is collectively known as the Lin-Lu Sintic Romanization System.
3. The population of the entire nation is slightly higher than OTL despite having a lower Chinese population due to a larger influx of foreigners in the early 20th century. A morally repulsive culinary culture involving women is the reason why the Chinese population is smaller.
4. When transliterating proper names, Wade-Giles Romanization is still used. IOTL the three people are known as Han Zheng, Liu Yandong, and Jiang Zemin respectively.
5. The First Kingdom in Zånhaean context refers to the Yue Kingdom, a tributary of the Zhou Dynasty.

The flag is adapted from Deviantart, the original context being for Zhejiang instead. The emblem is edited from the actual Shanghai International Settlement emblem.

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Thanks!

Well, I was thinking of either Governor Happy Chandler or Bull Connor (as he is Governor of Alabama instead of Wallace) being the candidate there.
Hmm, Nixon vs Humphrey vs Chandler
or
Nixon vs Humphrey vs Connor?

Those two alternate versions of the 1968 presidential election sound interesting.

I wonder how well those two guys would do against Nixon and Humphrey.
 
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