Well if someone hasnt well here we go this is believe it or not an actual plan to make the largest and jet powered flying boats but due to the failure of the flying princess it never became a reality (it was a post ww2 design but due to the rise of land based jet aircraft there are never any demands for flying boats again
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This is an artist impression btw i dont know if there any official sketch and the plane is called saunders roe flying queen btw
 
Well if someone hasnt well here we go this is believe it or not an actual plan to make the largest and jet powered flying boats but due to the failure of the flying princess it never became a reality (it was a post ww2 design but due to the rise of land based jet aircraft there are never any demands for flying boats again
View attachment 649555
This is an artist impression btw i dont know if there any official sketch and the plane is called saunders roe flying queen btw
I have a soft spot for flying boats.

Given the political issues of building new and extending existing runways I do wonder if there is a niche for them today?
 
I have a soft spot for flying boats.

Given the political issues of building new and extending existing runways I do wonder if there is a niche for them today?
Like Zeppelins and jump-jets, flying boats still exist where they make function sense. Otherwise, the application is a bypassed niche technology.
 
Hello,

I have a soft spot for flying boats.

Given the political issues of building new and extending existing runways I do wonder if there is a niche for them today?
They have transitioned into seaplanes so they can operated from land or water. As for uses...
 
I have a soft spot for flying boats.

Given the political issues of building new and extending existing runways I do wonder if there is a niche for them today?
Perhaps though can it land in rough water? Or during storm? I think mustard made a good video on flying boats
 
Flying boats are all well and good until the ground crews don't spot a submerged log floating in the landing zone and 100 people suddenly find themselves in crumpled up ball heading to sea bed.
 
Flying boats are all well and good until the ground crews don't spot a submerged log floating in the landing zone and 100 people suddenly find themselves in crumpled up ball heading to sea bed.
To be fair that is not an issue many areas typically have. Though the US Pacific northwest likely has that issue in abundance.
 
Okay this isnt alternate but still alternate in a way so the us when deciding to choose the new aircraft for the air force one came up with several i think and one of them is dc 10 so maybe in some tl where the dc 10 succeed hey it could become the air force one and not the boeing 747
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This is an artist rendition and just gotta day trijets is very pretty
 
Okay this isnt alternate but still alternate in a way so the us when deciding to choose the new aircraft for the air force one came up with several i think and one of them is dc 10 so maybe in some tl where the dc 10 succeed hey it could become the air force one and not the boeing 747
View attachment 649745
This is an artist rendition and just gotta day trijets is very pretty
Three engines, one to represent each branch of government...(in heavy American accent) just as the foundin faathers intended.
 
Northrup toyed with the idea of a passenger YB-35 variant.


I think you mean the YB-49, IIRC the piston engine version had noise and vibration issues for a passenger aircraft. The 'problem' was the same one facing the "blended-wing-body" aircraft; Once your passengers are 'outside' the central area of the body your motion related issues become rapidly uncomfortable. Things like banking and pitch become seriously noticeable to the passengers. There there's the fact that only a relative 'few' of the passengers now have an outside view, loading and unloading become more of an issue and internal movement becomes more of a problem.

The Flying Wing was arguably able to address some of these ("windows in the leading edge" what could possibly go wrong? :) ) it would have had serious issues adapting to the changing dynamics of airport passenger handling.

Randy
 
I think you mean the YB-49, IIRC the piston engine version had noise and vibration issues for a passenger aircraft. The 'problem' was the same one facing the "blended-wing-body" aircraft; Once your passengers are 'outside' the central area of the body your motion related issues become rapidly uncomfortable. Things like banking and pitch become seriously noticeable to the passengers. There there's the fact that only a relative 'few' of the passengers now have an outside view, loading and unloading become more of an issue and internal movement becomes more of a problem.

The Flying Wing was arguably able to address some of these ("windows in the leading edge" what could possibly go wrong? :) ) it would have had serious issues adapting to the changing dynamics of airport passenger handling.

Randy

The motion sickness is the real kicker. plus "ramping" or the feel that one is skidding downhill when one is inclined as in a bank.
 
And depending on who's "President" all the allegories about which 'engine' isn't carrying it's weight or living up to the expectations of those Founding Fathers :)

Randy
I'll take Politicial Puns Only My Father Would Make for $800, Alex
 
German Zero.jpg


Above we see an aircraft belonging to the 38th Buntai of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air service which fell into allied hands in 1943. Composed of German volunteers and known in their homeland as the Urlauber (vacationers) for their tropical surroundings the fifty strong German unit had been founded in 1937 as fighting broke out between the empire of Japan and China. The group did not arrive to Japan until 1939, by which time the clouds of war were already gathering in europe.

The unit, composed of crack German pilots, was initially equipped with the A5M Claude fighter, however they soon converted to the superior A6M, known in the west as Zero. Despite initial plans to return to the group to Germany via the Soviet Union (the reverse trip being how they had arrived in Japan to begin with) the unit would remain in Japan as a diplomatic and propaganda tool for the two nations to use to show their cooperation and friendly relations.

Seeing action initially in the Chinese theater of operations the unit would later be employed against the allied powers during the Japanese conquest of the Dutch East Indies and fighting around new Guinea and the Solomon islands. Facing heavy attrition in these campaigns but returning good results. The unit would serve its entire existence as a ground based unit and never served aboard a carrier (there is speculation the Germans planned the unit as a means of gaining practical experience in carrier operations for use aboard their own Graf Zeppelin) replacement of downed pilots became an issue as the first year of the Pacific war dragged on, with several Uboats being dispatched to Japan with fresh pilots and additional film for cameras being sent as losses mounted.

The unit was virtually wiped out attempting to provide cover in the Bougainville campaign, being left with by just three pilots fit to fly by the time the unit was pulled out of fighting. Afterwards the force was kept largely in reserve and never built up in a significant degree. The Germans would eventually collect the remaining pilots and ground crew in mid 1944, returning them to Germany via submarine and sending the pilots out in action.

Although their impact on the war was negligible, and the unit is little known today, the tale of the 38th is nonetheless a fascinating aspect of the second world war which doubtlessly deserves more attention.
 
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While the goodyear inflatoplane is very impractical for a military purposes somehow i believe this could be a succesfull civilian aircraft.
 
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