Air and Space Photos from Alternate Worlds.

F5 Teiger II of Number 5 Squadron Royal Welsh Air Force based at Pen y Cwm Air Base (RAF Brawdy) in a timeline in which Wales is an independent nation.
 

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What if (and hear me out) we take a space shuttle orbiter and External Tank and stick them on top of a metholox converted Saturn-V first stage? No, you're right, it's nuts. It's not the '60s any more, who'd throw away an S1-C like that?
So what if we took that S1-C, then stuck wings and jet engines on it so it could fly back to base..?

This was an actual idea, seriously presented, by NASA in the 1980s as the sort of thing that would be needed to support Space-based Solar Power (SPS) satellites.

@e of pi challenged me to put this together based on models I already had, including the Space Lifter first stage from his and @Polish Eagle's excellent Right Side Up timeline.

View attachment 666440
Quick note that "Hazygreyart" on YouTube did a vid of this shuttle version launching :)

Randy
 
F5 Teiger II of Number 5 Squadron Royal Welsh Air Force based at Pen y Cwm Air Base (RAF Brawdy) in a timeline in which Wales is an independent nation.
Click full image in your attachment and it will show the image properly, rather than just a small thumbnail.
 
I revamped an old render:


And then I went above and beyond:


As a penance, I did this, complete with lower-deck lounge:


And then Just Because, a 737-200 Advanced Quick Change with the South African winglets, the 1980s Boeing proposal for single-point in-flight refueling, and a gravel kit, because some runways will probably end up being made of crushed coral:


Edit: I got the exact position of the refueling pod wrong per this image from Flight International 1982-0988. I should have been further forward, and I will correct this on a later revision. I may also correct the tail to get the livery closer to the historic configuration. Based on the numbers from a 1981 edition of Flight International, a single '737-KX-150' in the heaviest configuration could refuel a pair of F-14s at a radius of about 600 nautical miles, or a pair of Sea Vixens at a radius of about 800 nautical miles.
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Boeing 747-300 (c. 1985) for a hypothetical U.S. flag carrier airline. The thinking is with the enlargement of the U.S. federal government in the mid-20th century, especially in regards to transport-related matters (such as with the interstate highways in the '50s, the establishment of USDOT and Amtrak in the late '60s and early '70s), the U.S. also decided to make an official state-sponsored airline.

The National Airline Passenger Corporation (doing business as United States Airlines [abb. USA or USAL {pron. EWE-sal}), est. 1972.
IATA: US
ICAO: USA (for United States Airlines)
Callsign: Tedstay (derived from the last and first syllables of "United" and "States", as the "A" in "USA" was deemed to sound too close to the ICAO pronunciation of the number 8).
Headquarters: 701 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004

This particular livery (nicknamed the "Tommy Hilfiger" due to its resemblance to the textile brand's attire) was the inaugural design from the 1970s, used until it was replaced by a refreshed paintjob in the early 1990s, which in turn was used until the mid-2000s, as part of an effort to revitalize the airline as part of a post-9/11 air travel slump. On the vertical stabilizer is a perched bald eagle, the same one used on the 1970–1994 USPS logo, as part of the U.S. government's effort to make a unique and unified branding logo (like Canada did with its wordmark in 1980 and France did with Marianne in 1999).

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Boeing 747-300 (c. 1985) for a hypothetical U.S. flag carrier airline. The thinking is with the enlargement of the U.S. federal government in the mid-20th century, especially in regards to transport-related matters (such as with the interstate highways in the '50s, the establishment of USDOT and Amtrak in the late '60s and early '70s), the U.S. also decided to make an official state-sponsored airline.

<snip>
While I have doubts as to the set up, It's not a bad livery. I think I'd also expect a transition in the 1990s to the Sonic Eagle as opposed to the Standing Eagle (similar to what I have here).
 
While I have doubts as to the set up, It's not a bad livery. I think I'd also expect a transition in the 1990s to the Sonic Eagle as opposed to the Standing Eagle (similar to what I have here).

Yup, that's what I had in mind for post-1994. I actually based it off the old SAA and KAL liveries from the late 20th century.

Speaking of which, made this livery for SAA, taking the old design but putting a different spin on it. I guess this could serve as a transitional livery after 1994 but before the introduction of the new paintjob in 1997. Took the old SAA livery and replaced the winged springbok with a protea flower and changed the colors to that of the RSA's sports teams.

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And a preliminary concept for a successor livery (c. mid-1990s to early 2000s) livery for USAL. Same Eagle as post-1994 USPS on the vertical stabilizer, and uses the USPS font as well for cross-agency branding consistency:

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Kaman CH-62 Yupik​

A fictional design I had in mind recently. It’s a bash of V-22 Osprey and CH-47 Chinook elements.
It’s used for tactical transport (troops and heavy material).
kaman_ch_62_yupik_by_beignetbison_deu395q-fullview.jpg
 
(Sry for lack of postings - lack of some of the models (of both Dizyfugu and Comrade Harps) to post without repeating (so the pauses will occur at some intervals), but I've return, and this time, Dizzyfugu Kfirs)

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IAI Kfir C.60, Bulgarian Air Force​

Link: www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfug…

Some background:
The Bulgarian Air Force (BAF, 'Bulgarski Voyenno Visitation Sili') is one of the oldest air forces in Europe and the world. In the past decade Bulgaria has been trying actively to restructure its army as a whole and a lot of attention has been placed on keeping the aging Russian aircraft operational In recent times BAF aircraft have been actively taking part in numerous NATO missions and exercises in Europe. In 2010, the Bulgarian Air Force's inventory numbered around 137 aircraft, including 55-56 combat jets. But only the MiG-29s and about a dozen Su-25s and a few MiG-21bis were flight worthy, the L-39ZA only used for training.

Since 2000 the BAF planned to retire most of its Soviet-era aircraft, keeping only the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-29 'Fulcrum' fleet (which was modernized only recently) as well as its Mi-24 gunships and the Su-25s. The MiG-21s in service were scheduled to be replaced with possible American or European aircraft – and in 2006, a proposal from Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) won a deal: the delivery of IAI’s Kfir C.60.

The Kfir C.60 was an upgraded version of the C.10, a variant developed especially for export and sold to Ecuador and Colombia. The most important feature of this version is the adaptation of the Elta EL/M-2032 radar, an advanced pulse Doppler, multi-mode Fire Control Radar intended for multi-role fighter aircraft originated from the Lavi project. It is suitable for air-to-air and air-to-surface mode, including high-resolution mapping (SAR), and offers a high mission performance in all weather conditions. Other new features include two 127×177mm MFD's, HOTAS configured cockpit, a Helmet Mounted Display System (HMD) and in-flight refuelling capability.

A total order of 18 Kfir C.60 was placed, deliveries were completed in April 2008. The planes were actually converted from mothballed IAF C.7 fighter bombers, keeping costs and development time low. The Kfir C.60 is supposed to replace BAF’s vintage MiG-21bis completely, parts of the Su-25 fleet and fill the gap of the fighter bomber role the Su-22 (which had already been retired in early 2004) left.

The Bulgarian C.60 would primarily be used in the ground attack/CAS role, but also augment the small MiG-29 fleet in air defence tasks. Consequently, the Kfir C.60 can not only carry a wide range of air-to-ground ordnance, the planes were also equipped with IR-homing AAMs like the R-60 (AA-8 'Aphid') and R-73 (AA-11 'Archer') missiles of Russian origin, still making up most of the BAF's weapon inventory.

All Kfir C.60 were allotted to the 3rd Fighter Squadron at Graf Ignatievo Air base, where they replaced the leftover ten MiG-21bis at 1/3 Fighter Squadron and grounded Su-25 from 22nd Ground Attack Squadron, formerly based at Bezmer Air Base.

It is uncertain if more Kfirs will be acquired, but chances are good. In January 2011 the Bulgarian MoD issued a Request for Information (RFI) regarding the acquisition of 8 multi-role fighters. The main competitors are expected to be the Eurofighter GmbH Eurofighter Typhoon, Dassault Rafale, Saab JAS 39 Gripen, Mikoyan MiG-29 or MiG-35, or the Lockheed Martin F-16 and Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet. On March 9, 2011 the Swedish Government submitted its response to the RFI containing 8 new Gripen C/D fighters. The Bulgarian MoD has extended the time limit for submittal of responses by two months due to the lack of responses from the other competitors.

In October 2011, IAI stepped in and offered the Kfir as a new combat aircraft for the Bulgarian Air force (see: www.timawa.net/forum/index.php?topic=29248.0) It coincided with the two days visit of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Bulgaria, which may bring another competitor for a new fighter for Bulgarian Air force – a modernized version of the Kfir C.60 already in service. Two weeks earlier the Bulgaria defence minister Anu Angelov was ‘tempted’ by such an offer when visited the IAI booth at the Paris Air show. The supposed price in times smaller compared to the ones offered by the companies requested by the RFI, sent in February to Eurofighter, SAAB, Boeing and Martin Lockheed.

Bulgaria and Israel held a joint session of their governments and signed a defence cooperation agreement on July 7 2011 in Sofia. "This is the first joint session that Israel holds with another country in the (Balkan) region," ministry spokeswoman Vesela Cherneva said. Cherneva added that the two countries will sign a bilateral agreement for defence cooperation, with Israeli companies encouraged to participate in the modernisation of Bulgaria's defence equipment.

However, as stated by the Ministry of Defense the contract for new multi-role fighter should be signed by midterm of 2012 and the first machines should start arriving in 2015. Tactical UAV should be procured in support of the land forces operations, too. No decision has been settled upon yet.[/URL]


General characteristics:

Crew: One
Length: 16.27 m (53 ft 4½ in)
Wingspan: 8.22 m (26 ft 11½ in)
Height: 4.55 m (14 ft 11¼ in)
Wing area: 34.8 m² (374.6 sq ft)
Empty weight: 7,285 kg (16,060 lb)
Loaded weight: 11,603 kg (25,580 lb) two 500 L drop tanks, two AAMs
Max. take off weight: 16,200 kg (35,715 lb)

Powerplant:
1 × IAl Bedek-built General Electric J-79-J1E turbojet, rated at 52.9 kN (11,890 lbs) dry thrust and 79.62 kN (17,900 lbs) with full afterburner

Performance:
Maximum speed: 2,440 km/h (1,317 knots, 1,516 mph) above 11,000 m (36,000 ft)
Combat radius: 768 km (415 nmi, 477 mi) (ground attack, hi-lo-hi profile, seven 500 lb bombs, two AAMs, two 1,300 L drop tanks)
Service ceiling: 17,680 m (58,000 ft)
Rate of climb: 233 m/s (45,950 ft/min)

Armament:
2× Rafael-built 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 553 cannons, 140 rounds/gun; 5,775 kg (12,730 lb) of payload on seven external hardpoints, including guided and unguided missiles and bombs, air-to-air missiles, reconnaissance pods or drop tanks.


dclk8ry-94ab6dc9-48eb-4a89-a9a8-bc487a9c5605.jpg

IAI F-21D Love - Royal Danish Air Force 1983​

Link: www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfug…

Some background
The Royal Danish Air Force (RDAF) was formed as a military service independent from the Army and Navy in 1950 from the merger of the Hærens Flyvertropper (Danish Army Air Corps) originally founded on July 2, 1912 and the Marinens Flyvevæsen (Danish Naval Air Service).

In the 1960s and 1970s the RDAF operated a number of US financed Lockheed F-104G Starfighters, North American F-100D/F Super Sabres, plus several other types, including an export version of the Saab 35 Draken in the ground attack role.

The 70ies brought a major re-structuring of the RDAF: The Hawker Hunter was phased out in 1974, as well as the Republic RF-84F Thunderflash reconnaissance aircraft in 1971. In order to rejuvenate their air forces in the 80ies, the NATO countries Denmark, Norway, Netherlands, and Belgium undertook a joint arms and introduced the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon as their common fighter-bomber in January 1980. The F-16 was later bought by further NATO countries, Greece and Turkey, and the United States of America, also a NATO member, operates the F-16, too.

As the F-16 deal was closed in the late 70ies it became clear that the Danish aging F-100 fleet and the limited number of Saab Draken (locally designated F-35) would leave a serious gap in the country's defense in the mid-80ies, esp. against ground and sea intruders. Additionally, the F-104G fleet was also about to reach its service life end, so Denmark decided to fill this gap with upgrades of existing types and the introduction of an interim fighter bomber.

One of the results was the WDNS (Weapon Delivery and Navigation System) update for the Danish Saab 35 Draken fleet. In the early 1980s all aircraft (a total of 51 was operated by the RDAF) received a Marconi 900 Series HUD and a Ferranti LRMTS (laser rangefinder and marked target seeker) in a characteristic nose fairing that resembled the photo recce version of the Saab 35, and an ALQ-162 jammer.

In parallel, Denmark bought a batch of IAI Kfir fighter bombers from Israel in 1978. The Israel Aircraft Industries Kfir (Hebrew: כְּפִיר, "Lion Cub") was an Israeli-built all-weather, multirole combat aircraft based on a heavily modified French Dassault Mirage 5 airframe, with Israeli avionics and an Israeli-made version of the General Electric J79 turbojet engine. The Kfir entered service with the IAF in 1975 in the C.1 version, but the updated C.2 with canard foreplanes and "dogtoothed" leading edges on the wings for better maneuverability followed soon.

The export aircraft for Denmark were basically of C.2 standard, but the RDAF had these aircraft further modified and brought up to the Drakens’ WDNS standard. This modification gave the Danish Kfirs a true all-weather ground attack capability, which was superior to the Drakens’ potential in many ways.

The latter were only capable of carrying outdated and rather unreliable AGM-12 Bullpup AGMs, as well as iron bombs or pods with unguided rockets. The modified Kfirs (locally designated F-21D and nicknamed 'Løve' (= Lion, as a translation of the type’s original name and hinting at a ‘more mature’ version), were not only able to carry state-of-the-art smart weapons like the AGM-65 Maverick or various HOBOS and Paveway guided bombs, they were also able to carry external sensor equipment like a TISEO (Target Identification System Electro-Optical), FLIR (Forward Looking Infra Red) or LANTIRN (Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night) pod. This offered, together with the LRMTS in the nose, a true and very flexible all-weather strike capability. Furthermore, the RDAF F-21Ds were able to carry more powerful electronic countermeasures which would significantly improve the type's survivability in hostile environment.

Most significant external difference of the Danish Kfir to its Israeli C.2 brethren was a modified nose with a stepped shape, similar to the updated Draken fighter bombers – the Kfir’s original, telemetric Elta Systems radar was omitted. Another modification for Denmark was an integral ALQ-162 jammer and an ALR-69 radar warning system, housed in a characteristic pod on top of the fin.
Less obvious changes included a beefed-up landing gear with an anti-brake system, night formation lights to NATO standard, a new Martin Baker ejection seat, a modern glass cockpit (with HMD capability and two 127×177mm MFDs) and the avionics to carry and deploy various guided weapons.

Even though the F-21Ds had an excellent rate of climb and top speed, and were able to carry up to six AIM-9 Sidewinder AAMs and retained their 30mm cannons, they were exclusively used in the ground attack/fighter bomber role. They replaced the last F-100D in Danish service at Eskadrille 727 and 730, relieving the F-35 fleet during the update measures and also filling gaps in the F-104G ranks, as some aircraft had been lost in accidents. The RDAF retired their Starfighters in 1986, being replaced by F-16 in the interceptor role.

Being just a gap-filler, though, the Løve only had an active service career of 12 years in the RDAF. It was gradually taken away from front line service from 1990 on, as more and more brand new F-16 became available. By this time, the F-21D fleet had also already been reduced to 16 aircraft through several flight accidents and engine failures. The last Danish Kfir/Løve was finally retired together with the Danish Saab 35 fleet in 1993. The remaining aircraft were returned to Israel, where they were partly stored and partly revamped to c.7 standard and sold to other foreign customers like Sri Lanka.

General characteristics
Crew: One
Length (incl. pitot): 15.73 m (51 ft 6 1/4 in)
Wingspan: 8.22 m (26 ft 11½ in)
Height: 4.61 m (14 ft 11 3/4 in)
Wing area: 34.8 m² (374.6 sq ft)
Empty weight: 7,285 kg (16,060 lb)
Loaded weight: 11,603 kg (25,580 lb) two 500 L drop tanks, two AAMs
Max. take-off weight: 16,200 kg (35,715 lb)

Powerplant
1× General Electric J-79-J1E turbojet (IAl Bedek-built) with a dry thrust of 52.9 kN (11,890 lb st) and 79.62 kN (17,900 lb st) with afterburner

Performance
Maximum speed: 2,440 km/h (2 Mach, 1,317 knots, 1,516 mph) above 11,000 m (36,000 ft)
Combat radius: 768 km (415 nmi, 477 mi) in ground attack configuration, hi-lo-hi profile, seven 500 lb bombs, two AAMs, two 1,300 L drop tanks)
Service ceiling: 17,680 m (58,000 ft)
Rate of climb: 233 m/s (45,950 ft/min)

Armament
2× Rafael-built 30 mm (1.18 in) DEFA 553 cannons, 140 rounds/gun under the air intakes
7× external hardpoints under the wings and fuselage for up to 5,775 kg (12,730 lb) of payload, including unguided air-to-ground rockets, AIM-9 Sidewinder AAMs; AGM-45 Shrike ARMs, AGM-65 Maverick ASMs, Mark 80 series bombs, Paveway series of LGBs, CBUs, BLU-107 Matra Durandal, reconnaissance pods, drop tanks or other tactical equipment like sensor pods.

iai_kfir_rc_7__royal_malaysian_air_force__1997_by_sport16ing_deqg55k-fullview.jpg

IAI Kfir RC.7, Royal Malaysian Air Force, 1997​

Link: www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfug…

Some background:
The Malaysian air forces trace their lineage to the Malayan Auxiliary Air Force formations of the Royal Air Force (RAF) formed in 1934. They later transformed into the Straits Settlements Volunteer Air Force (SSVAF) and the Malaya Volunteer Air Force (MVAF) formed in 1940 and dissolved in 1942 during the height of the Japanese advance over Malaya. The latter was re-established in 1950 in time for the Malayan Emergency and contributed very much to the war effort.

On 2 June 1958 the MVAF finally became the Royal Federation of Malaya Air Force (RFMAF), this date is celebrated as RMAF Day yearly. On 25 October 1962, after the end of the Malayan Emergency, the RAF handed over their first airfields in Malaya to the RFMAF, at Simpang Airport; it was opened on 1 June 1941, in Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur which was formerly part of Selangor and the national capital city. The first aircraft for the fledgling air force was a Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer named "Lang Rajawali" by the then Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman. Several Malayans serving with the Royal Air Force transferred to the Royal Federation of Malaya Air Force. The role played by RMAF was limited initially to communications and the support of ground operations against Communist insurgents during the Malayan Emergency. RMAF received its first combat aircraft with the delivery of 20 Canadair CL41G Tebuans (an armed version of the Canadair Tutor trainer). RMAF also received Aérospatiale Alouette III helicopters, to be used in the liaison role.

With the formation of Malaysia on 16 September 1963, the name of the air force was changed to "Tentera Udara Diraja Malaysia" or "Royal Malaysian Air Force". New types introduced into service included the Handley Page Herald transport and the De Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou. RMAF received Sikorsky S-61A-4 helicopters in the late 1960s and early 1970s which were used in the transport role. RMAF gained an air defence capability when the Australian Government donated 10 ex-Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) CAC Sabre fighters. These were based at the Butterworth Air Base. After the withdrawal of British military forces from Malaysia and Singapore at the end of 1971, a Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA) agreement between Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom was concluded to ensure defence against external aggression. The RAAF maintained two Mirage IIIO squadrons at RAF/RAAF Station Butterworth, Butterworth Air Base as part of its commitment to the FPDA. These squadrons were withdrawn in 1986, although occasional deployments of RAAF aircraft continue.

With the withdrawal of British military forces, RMAF underwent gradual modernization from the 1970s to the 1990s. The Sabre were replaced by 16 Northrop F-5E Tiger-IIs. A reconnaissance capability was acquired with the purchase of two RF-5E Tigereye aircraft. RMAF also purchased 88 ex-US Navy Douglas A-4C Skyhawks, of which 40 of the airframes were converted/refurbished by Grumman Aircraft Engineering at Bethpage into the A-4PTM ('Peculiar To Malaysia'), configuration (A-4Bs updated to A-4M standard). RMAF has traditionally looked to the West for its purchases, primarily to the United States. However, limitations imposed by the US on "new technology" to the region, such as the AIM-120 AMRAAM fire-and-forget air-to-air missile, has made RMAF consider purchases from Russia and other non-traditional sources. The early 1990s saw the arrival of a number of IAI Kfir fighter bombers from Israel and the first BAE Hawk Mk108/208s which replaced the T/A-4PTMs and the ageing F-5Es. These were followed by the MiG-29N/NUB in 1995 in the air superiority role.

Malaysia’s order for the IAI Kfir had been placed in 1989 and a total of twenty-eight aircraft were procured. These machines were among the last newly built aircraft of this type, comparable with the IDF’s late C.7 standard with HOTAS and a partial “glass cockpit”. Deliveries included twenty-four single seaters, optimized for the fighter bomber/strike role, even though the machines could carry light AAMs like the AIM-9 Sidewinder, too, and operate as interceptors. Additionally, four new Kfir TC.7 two-seaters were bought, primarily for conversion training, but these machines had, except for a reduced internal fuel capacity in the fuselage due to the second seat, the same capabilities as the TUDM C.7 single seaters. By 1992 the RMAF Kfir fleet was ready for service and the machines were concentrated at No. 17 Squadron, based at Kuantan Air Base, located at the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Even though they were not officially re-christened, the RMAF Kfirs were frequently referred to as “Anak Singa” among the personnel, meaning “lion cub” in Malaysian language.

In 1996, three TUDM Kfir C.7s were, with the help from IAI and imported hardware, modified into armed photo reconnaissance aircraft, resulting in the CR.7 variant exclusively operated by Malaysia. These machines received an elongated nose section (more than 4’ longer) with space for a rotating long-range oblique camera, similar in shape to the former “Tsniut” conversion of C.2 fighter bombers for the IDF. The guns were replaced with avionics but the C.7s’ Elta EL/M-2021B pulse-Doppler radar was retained, so that these converted machines kept their limited all-weather strike and interception capability. But as dedicated reconnaissance aircraft they were almost exclusively operated unarmed, just carrying up to three drop tanks for extra range and loiter time.

The Kfirs did not serve with the Royal Malaysian Air Force for a long period, though: In 1997, Malaysia received a dozen F/A-18D Hornet two-seaters to provide an all-weather interdiction capability, which the rather simple Kfirs did not offer. They could also use the AGM-84 “Harpoon” ASM, making them better suited for naval strike missions, and initially the Hornets frequently served as pathfinders for the Kfirs on all-weather missions. Despite their limitations, what still made the Kfirs attractive for the RMAF was their relatively low operational cost level and the type’s high speed and rate of climb.
However, in 2003 a contract was signed for 18 Su-30MKMs from Russia for delivery in 2007 to fulfill a requirement for a new multi-role combat aircraft (MRCA). Boeing alternatively offered the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, but the type was declined. These capable machines, which were adapted to Western ordnance like GBU-12 laser-guided glide bombs, eventually replaced the RMAF Kfirs, which were gradually phased out until 2010, mothballed, and put up for sale. The last new Su-30MKM arrived in 2009 August, but the F/A-18Ds remained in service – even though only eight machines were still operational at that time. Apparently, the RMAF’s budget was tightened in the meantime since a new requirement for a further batch of new 18 MRCAs remained unfulfilled. Furthermore, the RMAF has also been looking for an AWACS aircraft, although no firm orders have been placed.


General characteristics:
Crew: One
Length (incl. pitot): 16.92 m (55 ft 5¾ in)
Wingspan: 8.22 m (26 ft 11½ in)
Height: 4.61 m (14 ft 11 3/4 in)
Wing area: 34.8 m² (374.6 sq ft)
Empty weight: 7,285 kg (16,060 lb)
Loaded weight: 11,603 kg (25,580 lb) with two 500 L drop tanks, two AAMs
Max. take-off weight: 16,200 kg (35,715 lb)

Powerplant:
1× IAl Bedek-built General Electric J-79-J1E turbojet with a dry thrust of 52.9 kN (11,890 lb st)
and 79.62 kN (17,900 lb st) with afterburner

Performance:
Maximum speed: 2,440 km/h (2 Mach, 1,317 knots, 1,516 mph) above 11,000 m (36,000 ft)
Combat radius: 768 km (415 nmi, 477 mi) in ground attack configuration, hi-lo-hi profile,
with seven 500 lb bombs, two AAMs, two 1,300 L drop tanks
Service ceiling: 17,680 m (58,000 ft)
Rate of climb: 233 m/s (45,950 ft/min)

Armament:
No internal guns
9× hardpoints under the wings and fuselage for up to 5,775 kg (12,730 lb) of payload
 
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