AHQ: Earlier abolition of slavery in Brazil?

Brazil was one of the last countries (if not the last) in the Americas to abolish slavery. However, is it possible for the institution to be abolished earlier in Brazil with a POD of 1770?
 
How early are we talking about?
Any early, for example: José Bonifácio wanted to abolish slavery in the 1824 Constitution; there was a strong abolitionist movement in Brazil in the 1870s and 1860s, or even during the colonial era, some of the revolts that happened under Portuguese rule were led by slaves and some others called for its abolition
 
The question I'm making is: Did any of these examples ever had a real chance of succeeding? Are there other examples, and, if there are, were there chances of success?
 
You can have an earlier abolition, but Pedro I would've to face the land owners in battle. He was a capable commander but such things are unpredictable.

Maybe he could get some loans from Britain.
 
You can have an earlier abolition, but Pedro I would've to face the land owners in battle. He was a capable commander but such things are unpredictable.

Maybe he could get some loans from Britain.
Very interesting scenario, it would be like a civil war between the Imperial Government and revolting slaveowners across the nation
 
Very interesting scenario, it would be like a civil war between the Imperial Government and revolting slaveowners across the nation
Maybe the constitution crisis could be the catalyst and the abolition of slavery comes as a desperate move to weaken the opposition and use blacks as soldiers.

Something like "all slaves from states that rebel are free". This could snowball to full abolition after the war. Maybe with a deadline instead of a bang for those places that stay loyal.
 
Maybe the constitution crisis could be the catalyst and the abolition of slavery comes as a desperate move to weaken the opposition and use blacks as soldiers.

Something like "all slaves from states that rebel are free". This could snowball to full abolition after the war. Maybe with a deadline instead of a bang for those places that stay loyal.
So something like the American Civil War.
 
Maybe the constitution crisis could be the catalyst and the abolition of slavery comes as a desperate move to weaken the opposition and use blacks as soldiers.

Something like "all slaves from states that rebel are free". This could snowball to full abolition after the war. Maybe with a deadline instead of a bang for those places that stay loyal.
Very good, this would certainly be the most important event of the 19th century independent Brazil, if not of the entire history of the country as a sovereign nation
 
I guess it's perfectly possible without any major transformation.

Even though Brazil was the last country to abolish slavery, since the 1850's there were legislation in place that made clear slavery would have to go away eventually. That's why by the 1860's, "only" 15% of Brazilian population were slaves as opposed to 30% in CSA. By the time of abolition in 1888, it was under 5%.

A more interesting and frightening question is how long slavery would last in a surviving CSA. It could go on indefinitely as there were any signs they would want to terminate that institution. In fact, they seceded and faced a total war only to keep their slaves. And as in OTL they lost, the grudge against the Black population remains till today in some degree. That's how determined they were.
 
I guess it's perfectly possible without any major transformation.

Even though Brazil was the last country to abolish slavery, since the 1850's there were legislation in place that made clear slavery would have to go away eventually. That's why by the 1860's, "only" 15% of Brazilian population were slaves as opposed to 30% in CSA. By the time of abolition in 1888, it was under 5%.
Good point
A more interesting and frightening question is how long slavery would last in a surviving CSA. It could go on indefinitely as there were any signs they would want to terminate that institution. In fact, they seceded and faced a total war only to keep their slaves. And as on OTL they lost, the grudge against the Black population remains till today in some degree. That's how determined they were.
A CSA victory would've been nightmarish
 
Can be done, IF the 1831 Feijó Law gets enforced(the Feijó Law forbid the slave trade, that is, the import of slaves into Brazil), instead of being progressively ignored until no one enforced it after 5 years. This means the same dynamics that fed abolitionism in Brazil after the 1850 Eusébio de Queirós Law would come into play 19 years earlier (actually, things may speed up even more than those 19 years).
 
Can be done, IF the 1831 Feijó Law gets enforced(the Feijó Law forbid the slave trade, that is, the import of slaves into Brazil), instead of being progressively ignored until no one enforced it after 5 years. This means the same dynamics that fed abolitionism in Brazil after the 1850 Eusébio de Queirós Law would come into play 19 years earlier (actually, things may speed up even more than those 19 years).
The problem was: Brazil at that time was under a regency commanded by the very people with stakes on slavery. The only way this kind of thing could be enforced earlier is with a strongman monarch avoiding the regency completely.
 
Can be done, IF the 1831 Feijó Law gets enforced(the Feijó Law forbid the slave trade, that is, the import of slaves into Brazil), instead of being progressively ignored until no one enforced it after 5 years. This means the same dynamics that fed abolitionism in Brazil after the 1850 Eusébio de Queirós Law would come into play 19 years earlier (actually, things may speed up even more than those 19 years).

The problem was: Brazil at that time was under a regency commanded by the very people with stakes on slavery. The only way this kind of thing could be enforced earlier is with a strongman monarch avoiding the regency completely.

I believe that, in order to enforce abolition of slave trade, we'd need to completely avoid the regency. Peter 1th needs to 1) stay in Brazil and 2) get a powerbase strong enough to oppose the slaveholding elite. Gaining a decisive victory in the Cisplatine war and avoiding matrimonial scandals would help.
 
Can be done, IF the 1831 Feijó Law gets enforced(the Feijó Law forbid the slave trade, that is, the import of slaves into Brazil), instead of being progressively ignored until no one enforced it after 5 years. This means the same dynamics that fed abolitionism in Brazil after the 1850 Eusébio de Queirós Law would come into play 19 years earlier (actually, things may speed up even more than those 19 years).
A thousand times this. However, the Liberals will probably need to stay in power throughout the entire Regency period for it to work, which is a very tall order given the country almost fell apart during that time.

I wonder if giving Feijó a stronger position could suffice, or at least help? Say his attempt to fire José Bonifácio from his position as Pedro II's tutor in 1832 succeeds - it did fail by a single vote, after all - and he doesn't resign from the Ministry of Justice. Thus, by the time he's elected regent (in 1835), he has a few more allies and doesn't resign early.
 
Brazil was one of the biggest markets for slaves OTL. so a lot less profit for slave traders.
MiddlePassage_Hero.jpg
 
Brazil was one of the biggest markets for slaves OTL. so a lot less profit for slave traders.
MiddlePassage_Hero.jpg

Mortality rate of slaves in Brazil was extremely high due all sorts of diseases and birth rate extremely low. That's why African genetic marks in Brazil is lower than the massive slave traffic would make us to expect.
 
Mortality rate of slaves in Brazil was extremely high due all sorts of diseases and birth rate extremely low. That's why African genetic marks in Brazil is lower than the massive slave traffic would make us to expect.
How would Brazil replace in the labour of slaves?
 
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