AHQ/AHC: Superhero technology diffusion?

For Marvel, robots like the Sentinels could be adapted to automate virtually all manual labour and transform Earth into a post-scarcity civilisation.
I wouldn't want large numbers of Sentinels around. :eek::eek::eek: (That's why the future of "Days of Future Past" sucked so much.;) )

Seriously, however, you're right: having intelligent machines would wipe out most manual labor. (I see mass unemployment, not quite "post-scarcity", myself...) Speeding up what's now manual labor could only have beneficial consequences, beyond the UE.
I mean, Reed Richards would make Jeff Bezos look only somewhat rich from all the money he should make if he bothered to actually market his inventions. There's a reason why the "Reed Richards is useless" trope exists.
He doesn't have to market them. They're patented: somebody else can (should, would) produce items using them. (Providing they're useful...&, knowing Reed, I suspect many of them aren't, except for pure science.)

OTOH, given Reed, & Kang, have developed time travel... :eek::eek:

Also, AIUI, Reed is established to be rich: he owned the Baxter Building, at one time; IDK if he had Four Freedoms built for him & FF or not. (Not enough an FF fan.)

As for "is this ASB?", IDK... I keep getting threads moved when I don't think it warrants...
 
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IMO, the writers should have just made all his inventions depend on some exotic power source or material that he can't produce in large quantities.
Worm, a somewhat popular superhero web novel, solves this with "Tinker" tech, in which certain super-smart heroes, called Tinkers, are able to create gadgets that are not easily mass reproduceable, so it really can only be used by the super and them alone
 
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Worm, a somewhat popular superhero web novel, solves this with "Tinker" tech, in which certain super-smart heroes, called Tinkers, are able to create gadgets that are not easily mass reproduceable, so it really can only be used by the super and them alone
Sounds a bit like spark-made technology from Girl Genius. Only another spark (i.e. a mad scientist) would be able to understand the tech well enough to be able to reproduce it (though others can be trained to maintain it). Some of it, however, is beyond even most sparks.
 
Sounds a bit like spark-made technology from Girl Genius. Only another spark (i.e. a mad scientist) would be able to understand the tech well enough to be able to reproduce it (though others can be trained to maintain it). Some of it, however, is beyond even most sparks.
Eh somewhat different, most* Tinkertech in worm only works basically because the shard, the fraction of the interdimensional colonial parasite that grant powers in worm, is actively screwing with physics to keep it working. The higher performance relative to the materials/tools involved in creation increases maintenance requirements, a laser pistol built with scraps from a dumpster might need maintenance every two weeks, one built with high end parts in a lab might last a year, or be much more powerful if it needs maintenance every two weeks. Notably Tinkertech is not quite as nonsense as sparktech, and normals can learn something from it even if they can't copy it directly

Notably Worm did have tech growth, by 2013 there was mass produced power armor and plasma weaponry that wasn't tinkertech, more inspired by it coming out

*There are like two exceptions I am aware of
 
I wouldn't want large numbers of Sentinels around. :eek::eek::eek: (That's why the future of "Days of Future Past" sucked so much.;) )

Seriously, however, you're right: having intelligent machines would wipe out most manual labor. (I see mass unemployment, not quite "post-scarcity", myself...) Speeding up what's now manual labor could only have beneficial consequences, beyond the UE.
You could also take the software operating Sentinels and reuse it to build things like self-driving cars, planes and trains, which would hugely change the transport industry.

It could also have quite a significant effect on space exploration. You could do things like send a rocket to the Moon or Mars with a Sentinel on board and then have it start building a base there (and in time you might be able to start launching rockets from the Moon, which would be much cheaper due to the lesser gravity).
 
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You could also take the software operating Sentinels and reuse it to build things like self-driving cars, planes and trains, which would hugely change the transport industry.
The basic operating system, maybe...because the deeper programming leaves me in grave doubt of the Sentinels' ethical subroutines :eek: (such as they are:rolleyes: ).

I have some doubts about machine-operated airliners, unless we take humans out of the cockpit entirely, & that seems likely to produce a lot of passenger cancellations...at least in the short term.
It could also have quite a significant effect on space exploration. You could do things like send a rocket to the Moon or Mars with a Sentinel on board and then have it start building a base there (and in time you might be able to start launching rockets from the Moon, which would be much cheaper due to the lesser gravity).
That could work--given you want bases on the Moon to begin with. I'm of the view the delta-vee requirements are absurd until we've got something like widespread SPS for beamed power in the Solar System at large; capture & use of NEA asteroids makes way more sense to me.
 
i mean, we already have a massive uneven distribution of technology here in the real world.

But yeah, things would definitely start changing, especially if the infrastructure for wide scale implementation ever got out into place. People forget and or under appreciate the necessity of logistics for this.

And most writers kinda do feel like they have to keep things relatable to a degree. Then again, Hickman’s X-Men run has mutants terraform MARS in a master show.

Honestly, I do think it’s because writers feel there must be this arbitrary balance because otherwise it’s harder to write; that or fear of trivializing RL problems
 
The basic operating system, maybe...because the deeper programming leaves me in grave doubt of the Sentinels' ethical subroutines :eek: (such as they are:rolleyes: ).
Well, I was thinking you could just take the object recognition software (because perfect object recognition software is world-changing all on its own) they've got and then write your own program for handling all the decision-making stuff.

Another interesting application might be using the object recognition software on drones - it'd hugely expand their capabilities.
I have some doubts about machine-operated airliners, unless we take humans out of the cockpit entirely, & that seems likely to produce a lot of passenger cancellations...at least in the short term.
Don't pilots already spend most of their time using the autopilot as it is? Although self-driving planes would probably be of only minor use compared with self-driving cars.
That could work--given you want bases on the Moon to begin with. I'm of the view the delta-vee requirements are absurd until we've got something like widespread SPS for beamed power in the Solar System at large; capture & use of NEA asteroids makes way more sense to me.
Well, the Moon was just an example.

Ideally you'd get Tony Stark to cough up the schematics for the Arc Reactor, which would both solve the delta-vee requirements and provide energy for all Earth's needs (as well as considerably reducing emissions. Especially if you use it to develop electric cars).
 
You could also take the software operating Sentinels and reuse it to build things like self-driving cars, planes and trains, which would hugely change the transport industry.

It could also have quite a significant effect on space exploration. You could do things like send a rocket to the Moon or Mars with a Sentinel on board and then have it start building a base there (and in time you might be able to start launching rockets from the Moon, which would be much cheaper due to the lesser gravity).
In a world where Marvel or DCU go in real time, I feel that humanity would fully colonize the inner solar system by the mid-1980s since both worlds technology and other things like magic and reverse alien technology, would get humanity to that point.
 
Well, I was thinking you could just take the object recognition software (because perfect object recognition software is world-changing all on its own) they've got and then write your own program for handling all the decision-making stuff.
That makes sense. It's a good idea; I wish I'd thought of it. ;)
Another interesting application might be using the object recognition software on drones - it'd hugely expand their capabilities.
That's close to making them autonomous, which could have big implications for everything from combat use to pizza delivery.:eek::cool:
Don't pilots already spend most of their time using the autopilot as it is? Although self-driving planes would probably be of only minor use compared with self-driving cars.
They do, & in general, automation is a good thing in airliners. (Less so, IMO, in general aviation, but even then...) The problem comes in a crisis, especially when the automation is given authority over what the pilot does: this was directly contributory (if not causal) in the wreck of an A320 in Paris (the prototype?), when the autopilot thought the aircraft was landing, & refused (overrode) a command for full power on the throttles at high alpha...
Well, the Moon was just an example.
Noted.:)
Ideally you'd get Tony Stark to cough up the schematics for the Arc Reactor, which would both solve the delta-vee requirements and provide energy for all Earth's needs (as well as considerably reducing emissions. Especially if you use it to develop electric cars).
:cool: You've just eliminated my primary objection to electric cars.:) (Presuming you can overcome the battery disposal issue, & I continue to like superconducting wire for that...which IM should already have, but somehow doesn't.:confused: Then again, IM is so behind in computing tech...)
Honestly, I do think it’s because writers feel there must be this arbitrary balance because otherwise it’s harder to write; that or fear of trivializing RL problems
There is a Thing in superhero books that's odd as the blazes, if you stop & think a second. Superman (frex) is always rescuing people from fires in buildings, but have you ever seen him put out a forest fire, or stop a tsunami? (I presume he can... Superbreath freezing it sold everywhere it comes ashore, say?) No, I've never seen that.

I do think you're right, the writers don't want to trivialize RL, but I think there's some...blindness involved (maybe willful, for the sake of the characters). If you start having superheroes "meddling", you've created a world that's much harder for the reader to identify with, & much harder to write (it requires keeping it all straight, but also extrapolating all the possible implications...& that gets to be a biggie in a hurry :eek: ).

However, that's getting rather OT... ;)
 
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That's close to making them autonomous, which could have big implications for everything from combat use to pizza delivery.:eek::cool:
And it could be quite useful to rural areas and countries with limited infrastructure - a few years ago Rwanda developed a drone system for delivering blood supplies, which cut the delivery time from 4 hours to just 15 minutes in some cases.

And if you can get someone like Tony Stark or Richard Reed to develop an ultra-high capacity battery or power source, that opens up even more possibilities, since the drones would be able to carry more and fly further without recharging.
 
And it could be quite useful to rural areas and countries with limited infrastructure - a few years ago Rwanda developed a drone system for delivering blood supplies, which cut the delivery time from 4 hours to just 15 minutes in some cases.
Absolutely right. Which doesn't just apply in Africa; it could in parts of Canada, Oz, & Russia. Not to mention for disaster relief.
And if you can get someone like Tony Stark or Richard Reed to develop an ultra-high capacity battery or power source, that opens up even more possibilities, since the drones would be able to carry more and fly further without recharging.
Agreed. I favor direct power from SPS, myself, to eliminate the need for batteries in RPVs (&, arguably, for engines as we know them in airliners); I'm less sure it's possible to build a receiver for a car that could absorb enough at reasonable power density. (Multiple frequencies?)
 
Absolutely right. Which doesn't just apply in Africa; it could in parts of Canada, Oz, & Russia. Not to mention for disaster relief.
Aren't there a bunch of First Nations reserves in Canada that are so isolated they can't even get running water that's safe to drink? Autonomous drones with SPS or high-capacity batteries could be really useful for them.
 
Aren't there a bunch of First Nations reserves in Canada that are so isolated they can't even get running water that's safe to drink? Autonomous drones with SPS or high-capacity batteries could be really useful for them.
I believe there's a number of communities (not just First Nations) with that problem. It appears the sources of water are (somehow) unsafe, in each case, never mind "running water" being safe. (At least, AIUI.)

That's one reason I like the idea of SPS: it should be possible to "crack" any source of local water so it's safe. Not to mention being able to produce alcohol for fuel, without having to fly it in. :eek::eek: ( :rolleyes: ) (Again, AIUI...)

This might work as well with power relay satellites, which is also a good idea...
 
IMO, the writers should have just made all his inventions depend on some exotic power source or material that he can't produce in large quantities.
Except Reed is just one of many superhumanly intelligent heroes (not to mention villains and unaligned characters) so you’d have to impose this limit on the entire setting (and DC) which would interfere with certain aspects of the stories. They’re geniuses because they can make fantastical technology out of mundane items in a way that would baffle the greatest scientists in the world. You could drop them in a Home Depot and within an hour they’ll create force fields and ray guns that can take out a tank. As a random example Spider Man (who isn’t even top five in intelligence) once invented an explosive 15 times more powerful than TNT on the fly.
 
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They’re geniuses because they can make fantastical technology out of mundane items in a way that would baffle the greatest scientists in the world. You could drop them in a Home Depot and within an hour they’ll create force fields and ray guns that can take out a tank. As a random example Spider Man (who isn’t even top five in intelligence) once invented an explosive 15 times more powerful than TNT on the fly.
But then it introduces the question of why all these people are wasting their talents. I mean, literally any of the superintelligent villains could make infinitely more money as a normal scientist or engineer. superintelligent heroes could save far more people by doing things like revolutionizing agriculture*, or lowering energy costs, or whatever.

*The Green Revolution OTL is estimated to have saved a billion people from starvation.
 
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