A Man is Finished When He Quits - The Presidency of Richard M. Nixon (Redux)

I just have to have respect for a man that stood 90 miles off the coast of the world's most powerful nation and actively told them to effectively go to hell even when they repeatedly tried to have him killed. Not saying I agree with some or any of his policies, but that display of courage or whatever it was is deserving of some respect.
The man had balls of steel.
 
JFK is involved with other endeavors, while he had no intentions on running at all, the Nixon appointment was partially made to keep Kennedy out of the election and busy with managing the Cubans and his own marital recovery. Stuart Symington, Hubert Humphrey, and George Smathers could all be expected to make a showing for 1964.

The elephant (or donkey I should say) in the room is that of Lyndon Baynes Johnson, who still furious over Nixon's victory has created and planned for a warpath to take the nomination for himself. Knowing the man's personality, he will likely view this as the last chance he has to take the office. While Governor Pat Brown may be an interesting choice for a candidate or possibly a VP pick, he is less likely to be involved due to Ronald Reagan's holding lieutenant governor, an being the one who would take his place.

I would assume in some way that RFK would like to make a move as well, somehow. Or maybe he will in 1968....

Assuming that Nixon wins in 1964, its an even better assumption to believe that after 16 years of Republican control, the Democrats will be looking at 1968. I was thinking that maybe Reagan for 68, but he "left" the democrats in the 50's
 
I would assume in some way that RFK would like to make a move as well, somehow. Or maybe he will in 1968....

Assuming that Nixon wins in 1964, its an even better assumption to believe that after 16 years of Republican control, the Democrats will be looking at 1968. I was thinking that maybe Reagan for 68, but he "left" the democrats in the 50's

Without Bobby having been the Attorney General, he likely wouldn't have enough standing to win in the primaries, let alone have a chance against Nixon in '64. Bobby is running for a Congressional seat in'64 as hinted at way back, so if he runs in'68 he'll have something to claim as experience.
 
Without Bobby having been the Attorney General, he likely wouldn't have enough standing to win in the primaries, let alone have a chance against Nixon in '64. Bobby is running for a Congressional seat in'64 as hinted at way back, so if he runs in'68 he'll have something to claim as experience.
Wasn't RFK seen as Jack's sort of awkward and lanky younger brother before, well, '68, really?
 
Speaking of Castro, found a memoir from Audible from a former bodyguard of his. Not a fan of Castro, but the memoir by his ex bodyguard is pretty interesting.
 
Rewind Update - Alabama Governor's Election of 1962
-Rewind Update-
The 1962 Alabama Gubernatorial Election:


"Seymore, you know why I lost that governor's race? ... I was outniggered by John Patterson. And I'll tell you here and now, I will never be outniggered again."
- George Wallace, as attributed by Seymore Trammel.

The Gubernatorial Election in Alabama, as with most elections in the state, was not truly decided on election day. Due to the Democratic Party's complete and total dominance over the State's politics, the victor of the Democratic primaries effectively became the de facto governor-elect. This political infighting had inspired a practice of finely tuned skills. Smiles and handshakes were just as valuable as the figurative knife used for stabbing people in the back in this political climate. This style of politics was distinctively Southern and the election of 1962 would be used for years as an example of the complexity and uniqueness of southern politics.

George Wallace had always been viewed in his state as a moderate on race issues. Wallace had not participated in the Dixiecrat walkout in 1948 set against the renomination of President Truman for his positions on Civil Rights, a decision that had earned him both admiration and hatred depending on whom was asked. Wallace had become a judge in 1952 and through his actions presented a complex image of his positions on race. He was one of the only, if not the only, judge in the State of Alabama to refer to black lawyers by "Mister" and had granted probation to a number of African American prisoners; while at the same time became the first judge in the state to issue injunctions preventing the removal of segregation signs and also blocked Federal efforts to review voting lists in Barbour County. To say that George Wallace had created a confusing representation of his own beliefs was an understatement. In 1958, the same year he ceased to be a Circuit Judge, Wallace would be the primary opponent to John Malcolm Patterson a pronounced racist who ran with the open support of the Ku Klux Klan. Wallace, who had publicly spoken out against the KKK, was endorsed by black voters in the state and the NAACP.

The 1958 Gubernatorial election was a crushing defeat for Wallace, who was defeated by Patterson by over 34,000 votes in the primary. In the immediate aftermath, Judge Wallace confided in an aide that he would never be "outniggered" again. A natural politician, the man known as the 'fighting little judge' believed he had realized what it would take to win the governorship in Alabama. Wallace would use this tactic in 1962, playing the role of an outspoken racist and clinger to segregation.

In 1962, the primary results had not ended how Wallace would have hoped. There had been 8 contenders seeking the Democratic nomination and Wallace had proven unable to gain a majority. The two closest contenders had been Ryan DeGraffenried and former Governor Jim Folsom who together represented a majority's worth of voters. For the runoff election, Degraffenried, who had placed second, faced off directly against former judge Wallace.

Ryan DeGraffenried ran on a moderate stance on Civil Rights, something that had become slightly more tolerated after the horrors of the Freedom Rider Massacre of the year before and other violence had been displayed on televisions. With the support of Jim Folsom, DeGraffenried began to close the gap between himself and Wallace. A potential disaster was averted when former Governor Folsom was scheduled for a television appearance but did not arrive for the appearance. An irate DeGraffenried was both thankful and furious when he learned the reason why. Folsom had gotten severely intoxicated and, in a drunken stupor, passed out in his home. Had Folsom made it to the studio, severe damage would probably have been done to the anti-Wallace campaign.

Wallace's mask almost worked, but just as in 1958... the fighting little judge came up short, if only by a slim margin.

Ryan DeGraffenried - 307,162 - 50.19%
George Wallace - 304,957 - 49.81%


"God Dammit!, what in the hell does a son of a bitch have to do to win an election in this fucking state!"
- Purportedly exclaimed by George Wallace when hearing of the election results.


Yet another loss would now lead Wallace, a natural politician, to seek another route to power and success. Ryan DeGraffenried on the other hand, would become the next governor in an election that would also see the first Republican Senator in Alabama in the 20th century
 
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marathag

Banned
A film from OTL Vietnam of early BLU-82 tests. Invented close to ten years earlier than OTL, the BLU-82 is an even more impressive feat of weaponry.
from the wiki
The T-10 was an American-made version of the 12,000 pounds (5,400 kg) Tallboy modified to use standard American components. Development was started in late 1944 and plans were made to drop them on the fortified island strongholds of the Pacific to aid in softening their defences before amphibious assaults. None were ever used in combat, since the capitulation of Japan following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki negated their need. In the late 1950s the T-10 was re-designated the M-121. During the Korean War a number of T-10s were converted to the radio guided Tarzon bomb and were used to destroy railroad bridges and reservoir dams, being dropped by the Boeing B-29 Superfortress.[30]

After the Korean War ended and the B-29 and B-36 bombers were retired, the United States Air Force no longer had an aircraft that could drop the completely assembled M-121 and they were put in storage. Production of the T-10 ended in 1955. The B-36 was the last operational aircraft that could drop a fully assembled Tallboy type bomb in the conventional way.[a] During the Vietnam War, some M-121s, minus their rear streamlined shrouds and tail fin assemblies were shipped to Vietnam for Commando Vault missions where the warheads were incorporated into the BLU-82 weapons dropped by C-130s using radar control. The warheads were mounted on a platform and pulled by parachutes from the rear loading ramp of C-130s. After clearing the aircraft the large extraction chutes and pallets were cut away and small triangular chutes stabilized the large warhead until impact. A three-foot nose probe detonated the bomb at the correct stand-off distance. One of the last of the World War II Tallboy designs was dropped during a Commando Vault mission to clear a landing zone for helicopters on a ridge during the 1969 Battle of Hamburger Hill in Vietnam. Dropping from 3,000 metres (10,000 ft), the bomb hit exactly where it was needed. The Commando Vault missions were more accurate in bomb delivery on target than the more modern B-52s.
 
Just read this through and it's proven to be a really good timeline. Fascinating to see how Nixon could have done had he been elected in 1960 instead of afterwards and how it's effecting the Cold War. Great stuff all round.
 
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