What is communist church's view towards other religions? In case of conversion?

Does coummist party of Italy wish assimilate all other religious organizations under its church or they will to reform other religious organizations into similar format? So my question is are they looking to impose Christian supermacy or they support religious pluralism?
The RCC is plenty missionary, but it’s focus is pretty firmly upon the world’s Catholic population. They don’t turn people away, but missionary work is focused on winning the struggle with the Papal Church.

I want to make this clear. The RCC is an independent institution from the Italian state, and its support within the Communist Party is mixed at best - there are plenty of people quoting Marx and saying that this is entirely too unorthodox for their taste. The RCC benefits from their agreements with the cultural authorities, but as mentioned, is Run independently.

The Italian State doesn’t look at religions generally super positively and a good portion support the sponsorship of the RCC as simply a vehicle for the spread of revolutionary ideology, but active persecution of religious institutions has largely come to an end. So to conclude, religious pluralism is permitted but neither supported nor appreciated.
 
The RCC is plenty missionary, but it’s focus is pretty firmly upon the world’s Catholic population. They don’t turn people away, but missionary work is focused on winning the struggle with the Papal Church.

I want to make this clear. The RCC is an independent institution from the Italian state, and its support within the Communist Party is mixed at best - there are plenty of people quoting Marx and saying that this is entirely too unorthodox for their taste. The RCC benefits from their agreements with the cultural authorities, but as mentioned, is Run independently.

The Italian State doesn’t look at religions generally super positively and a good portion support the sponsorship of the RCC as simply a vehicle for the spread of revolutionary ideology, but active persecution of religious institutions has largely come to an end. So to conclude, religious pluralism is permitted but neither supported nor appreciated.
What is the situation in Russia? Religion wise?

What is RCC view towards woman bishops, same sex marriages and position of non Christans in their theology?
 
What is the situation in Russia? Religion wise?

What is RCC view towards woman bishops, same sex marriages and position of non Christans in their theology?
I don't think gay marriage was on anyone's radar in the 1930s. Even if they were at least neutral towards homosexuality on whole, they would find the concept of same-sex marriages utterly foreign.
 
I finally finished this massive epic of a story, and I have to say it's been an amazing ride. This is quite possibly the most extensive, well-researched story I've ever seen on this site.

Out of curiosity, how is Eastern European Jewry doing in the various Eastern European countries? While it looks like there's unlikely to be a Holocaust anytime soon, I'm guessing it isn't exactly a walk in the park for them?
 
As an Emilian, it's really nice to see the total chaos in Imola races. Thankfully Covid has brought here a F1 GP once again. The only good thing out of this goddamn pandemic.

Just how many of us Italians are there in this thread? Jeez :D

With those three factors in mind, it should make a good deal of sense for them to focus on reliability, ease of use, ease of training and mass mobilization of the general populace rather than a large standing army.

BTW, to compound on what Zulfurium has said, this is my own personal analysis (obviously not canon). Given that the Shogunate ITTL does not have the same need to plan for an extensive land war on the Asian mainland - if you need to employ the army defensively, it means something has already badly gone wrong and the war is lost. It's the Navy and to some degree the Air Force that can prevent an invasion of the Home Isles. Army-wise and given the very real limitations of the Japanese economy it makes sense to adopt a model not unlike the OTL 1942 Soviet one of focusing on production of very few select lines of simple equipment in giant factories to make full advantage of economies of scale, so that an invading enemy would truly be met with, to quote OTL, "a rifle behind every blade of grass". Of course such factories could be bombed if the airspace was contested. The other side of this kind of basic mass production BTW is that when you do send your elite strike teams to support an insurgency overseas, it really helps if you can also bring a buttload of cheap weapons with you. These weapons being simple to maintain and repair, requiring almost no training to operate etc is essential if you're handing them out to impromptu guerrilla movements far from meaningful supply lines. So both defensively and offensively the right tools for Japan are simplicity and mass production, with a cutting edge navy keeping the sea lanes open and preventing an invasion.
Then of course the other issue is oil. Even with a Soviet alliance, Baku is under Central Powers control ITTL, and at this point it represented something like 1/8th of global production. Nor are the Manchurian deposits available since they are under firm Chinese control IIRC. So while the Soviets will certainly export oil to Japan, they don't have enough to fuel a large-scale mechanisation of one military in peacetime, let alone two, especially since Soviet economic success ITTL likely means that domestic demand keeps growing. The German-Soviet fuel situation is almost flipped compared to OTL and this does also result in resource limits for the Shogunate to consider. The Navy will inevitably get first dibs on it because if the ships can't leave port and CAGs can't take to the air, well, there is a problem. So the army will have to make do with as little as possible. And that's fine, because any insurgency you will want to help is going to need anti-tank weapons and the like, not large-scale armoured formations. You can afford to equip small elite units with great equipment while leaving the rest of your people's army in a role of pure territorial defence against any enemy that's managed to actually force a landing.
 
What is the situation in Russia? Religion wise?

What is RCC view towards woman bishops, same sex marriages and position of non Christans in their theology?
I don't think gay marriage was on anyone's radar in the 1930s. Even if they were at least neutral towards homosexuality on whole, they would find the concept of same-sex marriages utterly foreign.

I have addressed the religious situation in Russia in quite a lot of detail - and the situation in Russia more generally, so you can go back and check them out if you want a greater degree of detail. However, the basics of it are that religion is frowned upon and without government support, at times swinging over into active persecution, but for the most part it is more a matter of neglect.

The RCC is exploring the idea of women priests and prelates, but it will likely take a good deal of time before everyone gets comfortable with the idea and for now all sanctioned RCC missionaries, priests and prelates are men. Same sex marriage is so beyond the pale that it is barely a graspable concept for most. As for non-Christians, they, much as any other missionary religion, think that they have a duty to convert them even if it isn't a focus at this point in time.

I finally finished this massive epic of a story, and I have to say it's been an amazing ride. This is quite possibly the most extensive, well-researched story I've ever seen on this site.

Out of curiosity, how is Eastern European Jewry doing in the various Eastern European countries? While it looks like there's unlikely to be a Holocaust anytime soon, I'm guessing it isn't exactly a walk in the park for them?

So happy to have you with us! It is honestly a bit funny, I can see when people start reading the show and essentially follow the pace at which they are reading based on when people like updates, so I have been waiting in anticipation for a couple days since I could see your pace increased rather explosively. :p

Eastern European Jewry are not exactly doing the best. Particularly Hungary's anti-semitic turn during its civil war have left a lot of Jews fearful and there is a pretty steady stream of migrants departing for the United States, Palestine and the Soviet Republic - particularly compared to OTL, the Soviet Republic is getting a pretty significant number coming their way. In general, Jews find themselves quite commonly accused of being Communists and face the more general anti-semitism they have faced for the last century or so, so not Holocaust-bad, but things aren't exactly a cake-walk.

Just how many of us Italians are there in this thread? Jeez :D

BTW, to compound on what Zulfurium has said, this is my own personal analysis (obviously not canon). Given that the Shogunate ITTL does not have the same need to plan for an extensive land war on the Asian mainland - if you need to employ the army defensively, it means something has already badly gone wrong and the war is lost. It's the Navy and to some degree the Air Force that can prevent an invasion of the Home Isles. Army-wise and given the very real limitations of the Japanese economy it makes sense to adopt a model not unlike the OTL 1942 Soviet one of focusing on production of very few select lines of simple equipment in giant factories to make full advantage of economies of scale, so that an invading enemy would truly be met with, to quote OTL, "a rifle behind every blade of grass". Of course such factories could be bombed if the airspace was contested. The other side of this kind of basic mass production BTW is that when you do send your elite strike teams to support an insurgency overseas, it really helps if you can also bring a buttload of cheap weapons with you. These weapons being simple to maintain and repair, requiring almost no training to operate etc is essential if you're handing them out to impromptu guerrilla movements far from meaningful supply lines. So both defensively and offensively the right tools for Japan are simplicity and mass production, with a cutting edge navy keeping the sea lanes open and preventing an invasion.
Then of course the other issue is oil. Even with a Soviet alliance, Baku is under Central Powers control ITTL, and at this point it represented something like 1/8th of global production. Nor are the Manchurian deposits available since they are under firm Chinese control IIRC. So while the Soviets will certainly export oil to Japan, they don't have enough to fuel a large-scale mechanisation of one military in peacetime, let alone two, especially since Soviet economic success ITTL likely means that domestic demand keeps growing. The German-Soviet fuel situation is almost flipped compared to OTL and this does also result in resource limits for the Shogunate to consider. The Navy will inevitably get first dibs on it because if the ships can't leave port and CAGs can't take to the air, well, there is a problem. So the army will have to make do with as little as possible. And that's fine, because any insurgency you will want to help is going to need anti-tank weapons and the like, not large-scale armoured formations. You can afford to equip small elite units with great equipment while leaving the rest of your people's army in a role of pure territorial defence against any enemy that's managed to actually force a landing.

Basically everything you just outlined here should be added to the considerations I mentioned. One thing I do want to note is that the Soviets are swiftly developing some of the recently found oil deposits in the Urals and western Siberia, so while there is a rather significant oil crunch at this point, it will be significantly alleviated relatively soon.
 
This was the first AH.com story I ever read. Just went through it a second time.
Always wondered what happened to my home nation ITTL.
OTL Korea under Japan got darker than the twilight sky.
 
This was the first AH.com story I ever read. Just went through it a second time.
Always wondered what happened to my home nation ITTL.
OTL Korea under Japan got darker than the twilight sky.
Happy to hear that people come back to the TL.

Where are you from? Could be the answer is coming up or I can give a brief rundown.

OTL Japanese Empire in general is just a horror show. In context the developments it went through make sense, but the systems failed massively so many times that it is hard to comprehend at times. As for OTL Korea under Japan, yeah it got really dark, particularly during WW2, and then they had to deal with partition and the Korean War right afterwards. Honestly amazes me how well the country recovered. South Korean history post-WW2 is honestly fascinating, the push and pull between autocratic dictatorships, economic growth, increasing democratic activism, military coups and rule. Basically the country has gone through so many different phases and come out surprisingly well on the other side of it all.
 
How overall Jewish view towards communism? I mean many of Jewish dispora settled in there. Are there any changes to mindset of Jew how they view communism? Do they still want to have an independent state or zionists still in power?
 
What does Switzerland think of the current world order and the events that led up to it? For a place of importance way out of proportion to their population, they tend to get pretty ignored in Europe-focused AH.
 
How overall Jewish view towards communism? I mean many of Jewish dispora settled in there. Are there any changes to mindset of Jew how they view communism? Do they still want to have an independent state or zionists still in power?

Again, most of these have been answered in the updates to one degree or another. There are a lot of Jewish Communists, as IOTL, and they are linked to it quite often. The OTL Jewish Pale is still existant despite pogroms and other anti-semitic actions in particularly the Don Republic and Hungary, and there are continued settlements into Palestine which has an ever-growing Jewish population. However, Palestine is not a Jewish nation and is ruled by Faisal after the settlement between the Arabs and the British. Pretty sure this is outlined in the update dealing with the Two Rivers Crisis, so I would refer you to that one for a reread.

What does Switzerland think of the current world order and the events that led up to it? For a place of importance way out of proportion to their population, they tend to get pretty ignored in Europe-focused AH.

The Swiss are not anywhere close to as alarmed as IOTL and never adopt the anonymous bank accounts which came into practice IOTL in 1934 - mainly due to the fact that the anonymization came about as a response to the rise of the Nazis and the persecutions of the Jews in Germany. We also don't see the same sort of military buildup as IOTL in the 1930s, with Swiss policy very firmly remaining one of pacifism and neutrality. However, the establishment of the Communists in Italy did have some rather significant impacts, with military spending increasing in the 1920s instead before levelling off when it became clear that the threat was not as great as originally perceived. The Swiss have some trade ties to Communist Italy, but have also been a recipient of pretty significant numbers of Italian refugees who have settled into many of the Italian cantonments with some difficulty. The rise of Integralism hasn't really scared the Swiss like Nazism did. Oh, and the expansion which followed the Great War IOTL from the debris of Austria-Hungary does not happen ITTL. That should be the quick and dirty on Switzerland.
 
Eastern European Jewry are not exactly doing the best. Particularly Hungary's anti-semitic turn during its civil war have left a lot of Jews fearful and there is a pretty steady stream of migrants departing for the United States, Palestine and the Soviet Republic - particularly compared to OTL, the Soviet Republic is getting a pretty significant number coming their way. In general, Jews find themselves quite commonly accused of being Communists and face the more general anti-semitism they have faced for the last century or so, so not Holocaust-bad, but things aren't exactly a cake-walk.
Wait, are they still able to immigrate to America? IOTL, there were really strict immigration quotas put in place by the 20s that effectively barred most Eastern European Jews (along with most Italians, Slavs, or anyone that wasn't from Western or Northern Europe). I forgot, did Butterflies kill those quotas?

Also, it should be interesting to see what happens in Palestine. A Jewish state is unlikely to show up any time soon (not with an Arab king in charge of the country), but with plenty of Jews still immigrating there they will become an important minority that'll make things complicated in the entire region.
 
Wait, are they still able to immigrate to America? IOTL, there were really strict immigration quotas put in place by the 20s that effectively barred most Eastern European Jews (along with most Italians, Slavs, or anyone that wasn't from Western or Northern Europe). I forgot, did Butterflies kill those quotas?

Also, it should be interesting to see what happens in Palestine. A Jewish state is unlikely to show up any time soon (not with an Arab king in charge of the country), but with plenty of Jews still immigrating there they will become an important minority that'll make things complicated in the entire region.
Quotas should still be in place (dear god has it been a long time since I wrote about the early 1920s US) but there should still be some making their way through - particularly the first half of the 1920s. I remember immigration being one of the issues of considerable political dispute during the Woods Presidency with McAdoo's presidency marking a turn against it. Anyway, I should add a fourth migration destination in the form of Germany as well, since they are actually one of the most open to Eastern European Jews.

Palestine will be interesting to explore. I am not quite sure where I will be going with events in the Middle East more generally, but at some point I will need to get back to covering events in the region.
 
Yeah October 2001. How weird must it have been to experience everything he had, reached the highs and lows, and still be alive to watch the Twin Towers come down in the last month of his life. There are times that I struggle to comprehend quite how much my grandfather's generation went through (basically the full 20th century).
If you think about it it's mindblowing. He saw the last emperor of China fall, he fought in the Chinese Anarchy, saw his country pass through swathes of decisive historical moment, and lived enough to see what's the most defining moment in contemporary history, in the history of our time.
Puyi has had an extraordinarily good propaganda campaign - the Last Emperor in particular.
Didn't expect this from Bertolucci.
The thing to understand about the Shogunate's view on the Army is that they have seen their essentially militia Red Guard successfully go toe-to-toe with the cream of the Japanese Army and come out on top. Additionally, the Shogunate does not see itself as an expansionist power which would need a massive military force to subdue its conquests, but rather as a liberating force which will be able to rely upon local support wherever they go in their quest to spread the revolution. Finally, bear in mind the way in which the Soviets IOTL pre-Stalinist reforms actually wanted to rely entirely on a volunteer part-time army made up of the sinews of the Peoples - that is basically the attitude taken by the Shogunate ITTL. With those three factors in mind, it should make a good deal of sense for them to focus on reliability, ease of use, ease of training and mass mobilization of the general populace rather than a large standing army. What is left are essentially a small, elite, force meant to serve as special forces/vanguard/backbone of the aforementioned mass mobilized army and the Navy. Where the OTL and pre-Civil War inter-service rivalry was essentially a contest between equals, in the Shogunate the Navy is very much king, so while the rivalry exists, it is unlikely to be anything close to the problematic force of OTL. The Navy is where the Shogunate puts its focus for multiple reasons - force projection, defense of the Home Isles and prestige following the Battle of the ECS being foremost amongst them. There is also some remaining anti-Army bias considering that the majority of the IJA fought for the Loyalists. In a lot of ways it can be seen in the same light as the OTL British situation where the Army is very much second fiddle to the Navy at least as much for the fact that the Army was viewed as untrustworthy and politically unreliable after its role in the establishment of the Commonwealth as the geopolitical situation.
Now it's a lot clearer. Clever move!
Just how many of us Italians are there in this thread? Jeez :D
Lol, I thought you were German, don't know why. Where are you from?
 
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Just how many of us Italians are there in this thread? Jeez :D
I think that it's meta power of the Red Italy that is subconsciously attracting us in this thread!
On a more serious note i think that this TL has done a really outstanding work in making a functioning and believable version of Italy turning communist. I didn't comment much on it since my knowledge of Italy in that period isn't great, but i still appreciate it a lot since it resonates well with my own personal background since i was born and grew in a typical leftwing family from Emilia Romagna.

While Genka miscalculated and is rather bound up in his perception of the world, I don't want to make him out to be a stupid man by any measure. In fact, your description of him as rather surprisingly competent in the fact that he has been able to balance everything for the time being was pretty close to what I was going for, so happy to know that the right notes were struck again. I do want to say that imo it is highly unlikely the Nobuhito gets removed from the line of succession - he is a major threat to Genka, but he is still his brother and Genka's mother would never forgive something like that. One thing to bear in mind is that Genka is still married ITTL - just because he was childless IOTL doesn't mean he will be ITTL. As for Takeda Tsuneyoshi I don't think Genka would be willing to let the line of inheritance leave his family in that way, but if worse came to worst that would definitely be where he would look for a potential heir.
Glad to know you appreciated my idea regarding Takeda Tsuneyoshi. And yes, considering that Genka could have have children, and that Nobuhito could still survive his brother's ire, he's probably a bit far from the throne. But i was thinking that he could become the devil on the shoulder of Genka, so to speak. He could become the rallying figure for the more conservative hardliner Japanese in Chosun, he's the perfect figure for this purpose. This could also prompt Nobuhito to become the angel on the other shoulder of Genka, as once again he would be the perfect figure for the more liberal Japanese in Chosun. And if their roles become official in the constitutional asset of Chosun then this could evolve into a resurrection of the Minister of the Left and Right roles that existed during the Heian Period, only under a different shape as they will be the official state spokesperson for their factions, forming a triumvirate along with a neutral Prime Minister. It would be a way to partially democratize Chosun, without really democratizing it keeping lot of power in the cliques gravitating around the Emperor.
Sorry if this is steeping on your shoes, something i get carried away a bit too much into my flow of speculative thoughts

Also i've been doing a bit more research on other possible heir to the Japanese throne, and the following names came up in my research: Nagahisa Kitashirakawa, Asaka Yasuhito, and Higashikuni Morihiro.
None of them were very prominent in the court as far as i know, only the latter one was quite involved into politics. Make of this what you will. Especially in relation to Emperor Koji, since he has a shortage of heirs, and i don't think the Shinnoke collateral branches are willing to lend him one.
Considering that Prince Mikasa in OTL lived until 2016, and outlived all his male children, and if this will be the same in this TL than either he abdicates before one of his children, or he will introduce female primogeniture making the throne pass to the Konoe family whose heir is married to his first daughter, or he goes fully deep in the People's Shogunate ideology declaring that he's the last emperor and that with his death the power will fully go to the people.
But once again, i'm thinking too much about the long term consequences without keeping in mind that there could still be so many developments

Anyway glad to hear that you're progressing well on the India chapter, i'm just curious on how you will organize it since India is basically a continent on its own, will you divide the chapter along regional sections?
If that's the case then i'm very curious to see what happens in Gujarat, Bengal and southern India.
 
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Glad to know you appreciated my idea regarding Takeda Tsuneyoshi. And yes, considering that Genka could have have children, and that Nobuhito could still survive his brother's ire, he's probably a bit far from the throne. But i was thinking that he could become the devil on the shoulder of Genka, so to speak. He could become the rallying figure for the more conservative hardliner Japanese in Chosun, he's the perfect figure for this purpose. This could also prompt Nobuhito to become the angel on the other shoulder of Genka, as once again he would be the perfect figure for the more liberal Japanese in Chosun. And if their roles become official in the constitutional asset of Chosun then this could evolve into a resurrection of the Minister of the Left and Right roles that existed during the Heian Period, only under a different shape as they will be the official state spokesperson for their factions, forming a triumvirate along with a neutral Prime Minister. It would be a way to partially democratize Chosun, without really democratizing it keeping lot of power in the cliques gravitating around the Emperor.
Sorry if this is steeping on your shoes, something i get carried away a bit too much into my flow of speculative thoughts

Also i've been doing a bit more research on other possible heir to the Japanese throne, and the following names came up in my research: Nagahisa Kitashirakawa, Asaka Yasuhito, and Higashikuni Morihiro.
None of them were very prominent in the court as far as i know, only the latter one was quite involved into politics. Make of this what you will. Especially in relation to Emperor Koji, since he has a shortage of heirs, and i don't think the Shinnoke collateral branches are willing to lend him one.
Considering that Prince Mikasa in OTL lived until 2016, and outlived all his male children, and if this will be the same in this TL than either he abdicates before one of his children, or he will introduce female primogeniture making the throne pass to the Konoe family whose heir is married to his first daughter, or he goes fully deep in the People's Shogunate ideology declaring that he's the last emperor and that with his death the power will fully go to the people.
But once again, i'm thinking too much about the long term consequences without keeping in mind that there could still be so many developments

Anyway glad to hear that you're progressing well on the India chapter, i'm just curious on how you will organize it since India is basically a continent on its own, will you divide the chapter along regional sections?
If that's the case then i'm very curious to see what happens in Gujarat, Bengal and southern India.
I am more than happy to see speculation of this sort, it is really quite interesting so don't hold back. I won't promise that any of it makes it into the timeline, but I also won't promise to not ruthlessly steal any idea I find interesting or good. I do like the idea of resurrecting the classical confucian structures of Ministers of the Left and Right, but when everything is taken into consideration Genka is much more of a modernist integralist autocrat than a traditionalist Confucianist if that makes sense. Just to clarify, the ministerial system you were outlining is drawn entirely from Confucian concepts - particularly some of the Neo-Confucian structures which emerged during the Song dynasty and which were actually quite influential in the foundational structures of Joseon. However, the Meiji Empire, Showa regime and TTL's Genka regime are all significantly more in the Shintoist realm of ideological thought, which has some quite significant divergences from the Confucian ideal.

One thing I should note is that Takahito has married differently from OTL, as is mentioned in the TL in the pre-Civil War Japanese updates, to Nobuhito's OTL wife Princess Tokugawa Kikuko. I really found it a fun idea to have the Tokugawas back in power through her becoming Empress alongside Takahito. I do have plans for heirs - might actually already have them at this point, just haven't found an opportunity to mention it at this point in time. And as you mentioned, this is pretty far into the future so I have no idea of how significantly the butterflies will have swept things aside by that point.

I just finished out the second to last paragraph on the India section. It is honestly a challenge to divide up, but I am not doing it in regional sections. Instead the structure is generally chronological, starting with the aftermath of the Two Rivers Crisis, and then drawing in various major forces as they become relevant and introducing them. The untouchables, the RSS and wider Hindutva movement, the Communist movements, the course of all the various already established major forces in the independence movement and counter-independence movement. However, as part of that process, there are certain regions which rise to importance in the narrative which is when they get drawn in - be it Hyderabad (which has quite a lot of stuff going on this time around), the Bengal or somewhere else. It is always something of a balance and the particular approach changes depending on the topic I am writing about, but I generally try to cover the chronological progress, the thematic topics of interest and the factional developments of importance to one degree or another. With the Japanese section for example I started out with a very thematic coverage of the Shogunate because I needed to really dig into what this entirely new and fictitious state actually looks like, while still maintaining some sort of chronological progress. With the Chinese update it is much more of a factional outlook, covering what every side is doing and how their intrigues intersect and impact one another, while having to provide plenty of background to bring everything up to date. With the SEA/Australasia section it is much more chronological and regional in outlook, moving from one country to the other and providing a basic overview of events as they move forward through time. It is very much a matter of mixing and matching, figuring out what will work best in any one context, and also some degree of natural adaptation as the first couple of paragraphs finish and start to change the course of the later ones. @Ombra will be able to attest to how much my notes on any one paragraph change as I write my way through a section.
 
Nice update Zulfurium, it was interesting seeing the internal politics of the People's Shogunate and Loyalist held Korea. I find it amusing to see the loyalists being near-puppets of the Chinese.

Also, since the People's Shogunate managed to send supplies to the Indochinese rebels and the French navy backed down, what exactly is the state of the French navy at this point? I recall that the army and air force received much more focus in the aftermath of the Great War so it probably has been somewhat neglected.
 
If you think about it it's mindblowing. He saw the last emperor of China fall, he fought in the Chinese Anarchy, saw his country pass through swathes of decisive historical moment, and lived enough to see what's the most defining moment in contemporary history, in the history of our time.

I get the same feeling every time I run into a similar case of 20th century longevity, since that century was so insanely packed with world-altering events. My own great-grandmother died in 2004 at age 100, and it was a similar story for her - when she was born, the remote country town she hailed from was literally still tied to a feudal landowning agricultural system. By the time she turned 100 she was a EU citizen with a public Italian pension and lived in a house with an internet connection.
Crazy.

Lol, I thought you were German, don't know why. Where are you from?

Apulia! I have lived in Germany in the past though, so there is that :D

I think that it's meta power of the Red Italy that is subconsciously attracting us in this thread!

Joke's on you, by the time I started reading the timeline, the Great War wasn't even over yet! *Old man yells at cloud*

On a more serious note i think that this TL has done a really outstanding work in making a functioning and believable version of Italy turning communist. I didn't comment much on it since my knowledge of Italy in that period isn't great, but i still appreciate it a lot since it resonates well with my own personal background since i was born and grew in a typical leftwing family from Emilia Romagna.

It's uncannily believable, isn't it? I also can't complain, since Apulia ended up getting a nice windfall compared to OTL :D

I do like the idea of resurrecting the classical confucian structures of Ministers of the Left and Right, but when everything is taken into consideration Genka is much more of a modernist integralist autocrat than a traditionalist Confucianist if that makes sense. Just to clarify, the ministerial system you were outlining is drawn entirely from Confucian concepts - particularly some of the Neo-Confucian structures which emerged during the Song dynasty and which were actually quite influential in the foundational structures of Joseon.

For the record, Zulfurium and I have been binge-watching Six Flying Dragons with fanatical enthusiasm (a rewatch for him, he was kind enough to introduce me to the masterpiece), so the moment I saw a mention of Left and Right ministers I literally laughed out loud x'D
 
Will there be any influence of ramkrishna mission on hindutva? The Stance against untouchability? Also swami Vivekananda and aurodindo were huge influence to RSS, is it same here?
 
Nice update Zulfurium, it was interesting seeing the internal politics of the People's Shogunate and Loyalist held Korea. I find it amusing to see the loyalists being near-puppets of the Chinese.

Also, since the People's Shogunate managed to send supplies to the Indochinese rebels and the French navy backed down, what exactly is the state of the French navy at this point? I recall that the army and air force received much more focus in the aftermath of the Great War so it probably has been somewhat neglected.

It is rather amusing to consider, isn't it? I found the irony too delicious to ignore and the plausibility of the shoe being on the other foot here is very high as well which makes the whole thing so much better.

The French Navy has been at the bottom of military investments, that is true, but it is just as much if not more so the fact that the Shogunate just trounced the British Navy in one of the largest naval victories in world history and are very much playing in their home court when it comes to the region we are discussing. I will be explaining the naval concerns a good deal more with the Indochina section, so you should get a more direct response there.

Will there be any influence of ramkrishna mission on hindutva? The Stance against untouchability? Also swami Vivekananda and aurodindo were huge influence to RSS, is it same here?

A lot of these organizations and institutions mentioned here are still going to be present and playing a role, but I am not going to be referencing them directly. The RSS and some other more political Hindu Nationalist institutions are explored and their development detailed, but relatively apolitical institutions like Ramkrishna Mission are not going to be mentioned unless they become directly relevant to the narrative.

Untouchability plays a pretty big role in the Indian section and the development of the movement is explored in quite significant detail. Won't say more than that, though.
 
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