What if Brazil was ALSO colonized by the English as well?

1. How would that be possible? What parts would've been settled?
2. Would the country have its own war of independence?
3. Can this"United States of Colombia" get this pic's territory? Would it be different?
Brazil.png

4. Can they get Pacific access through northern Peru?
5. Would they fight Portuguese Brazil in the 1820s/30s similar to the Mexican-American war?
6. What changes happen in this world in 20th and 21st centuries? Effects on Cold war? west Africa? In general what would their internal politics be?
7. What would their statistics (pop, GDP, types of people living there, etc...) be?/How powerful would they be compared to America?
8. If USC and USA helped each other out, would America gain more territory? (And other changes to America in general)
9. What other important changes do you think might happen?
 
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If it is the Wnglish trying to settle here, I think the Spanish would not allow the constant western movement of the Brazilian border like they gave to Brazil. England also would need to consider if this is worth going against their long alliance with Portugal, though I suppose if they English are in the far north or south away from the Portuguese areas, it might not be an issue. I do not know if this land would be lucrative enough without slave labor for the English to go to such a distant place. Presumably this will end up with some new or different English colonies in Africa. Come to think of it, all the Portuguese ones were, at least later on, very focused on obtaining slaves. Maybe the Portuguese try providing the slaves to the English, so long as the English don’t try competing in the slave markets in Africa?
 
If it is the Wnglish trying to settle here, I think the Spanish would not allow the constant western movement of the Brazilian border like they gave to Brazil. England also would need to consider if this is worth going against their long alliance with Portugal, though I suppose if they English are in the far north or south away from the Portuguese areas, it might not be an issue. I do not know if this land would be lucrative enough without slave labor for the English to go to such a distant place. Presumably this will end up with some new or different English colonies in Africa. Come to think of it, all the Portuguese ones were, at least later on, very focused on obtaining slaves. Maybe the Portuguese try providing the slaves to the English, so long as the English don’t try competing in the slave markets in Africa?
Now if somehow this colony came into existence and managed to become like the 13 colonies up in the north what are the effects from the 18th to the 21st-century ITTL?
(As in questions 2 to 9)
 
What if Brazil was ALSO colonized by the English as well?

1. How would that be possible? What parts would've been settled?
2. Would the country have its own war of independence?
3. Can this"United States of Colombia" get this pic's territory? Would it be different?
PICSNIPPAGE
4. Can they get Pacific access through northern Peru?
5. Would they fight Portuguese Brazil in the 1820s/30s similar to the Mexican-American war?
6. What changes happen in this world in 20th and 21st centuries? Effects on Cold war? west Africa? In general what would their internal politics be?
7. What would their statistics (pop, GDP, types of people living there, etc...) be?/How powerful would they be compared to America?
8. If USC and USA helped each other out, would America gain more territory? (And other changes to America in general)
9. What other important changes do you think might happen?
1. There's several ways. The least likely (though not impossible) is for England to somehow kick off the overseas exploration/trade/conquest of the Africa-East Indies route. This would need a pretty early POD and/or Iberia (Spain and Portugal both)-screw IMO. Between 1550 and 1650 they could pull a "Groot Desseyn" and try conquering it from Portugal; this wouldn't be easy, though no less possible than the Netherlands pulling it off. In that same timeframe, there's the added complication of the Iberian Union potentially opening the place for conquest while Portugal is trying to get out from under Madrid's thumb. Post 1800 it could also be conquered by Britain, though by then holding/consolidating it IMO would be biting off more than they could chew. I personally love a 1501-1540 POD of England either taking or buying it from Portugal, since prior to 1540 Brazil wasn't important to the Portuguese for much beyond shipping resupply and lumber for the East Indiamen ships (this might require a different War of the Roses outcome).
2. Maybe, maybe not. Really depends how events in the 1600-1900 play out in terms of colonies generally going independent in the Americas, and whether England/Britain grants Dominion-esque autonomy to the place if not. Then there's the slave trade and/or gold revenue distribution issues if one wanted a regionally-specific powderkeg to kick off a revolution.
3. First off, "United States of Columbia"? Nah, just nah. I don't see an Anglo-Brazil resembling the USA at all*, especially politically speaking. That aside, those boundaries kind-of make up Brazil's 'natural borders' but that concept is itself a red herring. I don't see Spain or its independent colony-descendants brooking those borders without a lot of protest and/or fighting for it. Unlike the U.S., that's a lot of territory in multiple directions against multiple near-peer (potentially anyway) opponents to defeat. I'm doubtful about it working or not.
4. Maybe, though don't underestimate how difficult crossing the Atacama Desert is, even now. In the 18th/19th century it'd be a massive undertaking just getting railroads westward to the Pacific, and then somehow linking cities/towns in a consistent manner (places like Arica are a far cry in economic value from San Francisco or Acapulco, after all).
5. If you mean England/Britain gets part of OTL Brazil and then expands against a Portuguese-held part of OTL Brazil, then I suppose it could happen if either component is independent from their country of origin. If they're both still colonies and one colonizer didn't eat the other's portion early on, then I'm more skeptical.
6. Sooooo many butterflies. Likely, those events you mentioned wouldn't happen at all, since the conditions needed for the OP to happen would render other parts of the world turning out differently much earlier (and thus, no FREX Cold War). Internal politics is also an open question, it really depends on how Point #2 plays out.
7. If we're going by your borders indicated, then a population range of 200-240 million could work as a rough idea**. Probably similar GDP to OTL, Brazil has lots of resources and the near-omnipresent Dutch Disease to go with it; combined with a probable agricultural basis to its colonial and post-colonial economy, it wouldn't be a manufacturing powerhouse till later***. It's not going to be a superpower no matter who colonizes it, though a great power is an outside possibility. Demographically it won't and can't have a large white-majority (pre-modern medicine + tropical diseases + demographic settlement likelihoods working against wide-scale family settlement= no New England-style whitey-land in the southern hemisphere); white-plurality or 50-55% majority, maaaybe. Expect large mixed and African-descended cohorts, and probably a decently-sized Asian population. With those borders, Indigenous peoples also would be fairly numerous up north and out west.
8. Either the USA exists or the USC exists. Pick One. You're not getting both, if for no other reason than Britain doesn't have the people to send to settle both while also operating as an otherwise functioning country. Not saying a USA-equivalent and Anglo-Brazil can't coexist in the same TL, but you're not getting Twin Countries across the Equatorial line. One's gonna be smaller/less populated/less important as a colony than the other.
9. We're missing waaay too much established details/hard facts about the setting to make that call; the world's bigger than one hemisphere, and how we get to the OP matters as much as the OP itself in answering #9. One estimate of mine is there wouldn't be any English/British West Indies in the Caribbean; Brazil offers all the advantages and products those places could, only on steroids, so the OTL efforts London made in the Caribbean would be spent here instead. Thus, the Caribbean might be a Spanish-French-Dutch lake.

*Gonna walk this back in one way; I picture an Anglo-Brazil culturally resembling something of a sliding scale, with the Deep South (only less Jim-Crow-y) on one end, and Jamaica/Barbados/etc. on the other (only relatively more immigration besides imported slave labor). So it might have aspects of the OTL U.S. in a regional-transplant sense, but not as a whole.
**The bulk of the population would be in the south and south-east, it's climatically the optimum spot for building large communities and located near large forests and mining locations. The less of those regions Brazil owns, the smaller the likely population.
***It's gonna be a giant plantation economy, with localized gold/mineral mining to supplement and/or complement that sector. You're not doing massive shipbuilding, or doing any other maritime industry than servicing East Indies cargo haulers and maybe whaling. And modern manufacturing wouldn't come till later anyway, but when it does it'd have to play catch-up in developing infrastructure to support it that places in North America already lent themselves to.
 
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I guess the best way to picture a British Brazil is looking at OTL South Africa and to a lesser degree, Canada: we would have the British controlling a society dominated by other Europeans, with their own institutions and religion firmly established.

If British were skillful enough, they could avoid major conflicts with the local Portuguese Brazilians in a way they didn't manage to do in South Africa with the Afrikaners.

As we enter in the end of 19th century, as it happened in OTL, Brazil would receive millions of European immigrants, aside Portuguese and British, Italians and Germans would immigrate there, blurring an eventual British-Portuguese divide in society.

Demographically, I guess Brazil would be slightly more White, and slightly better off economically.
 
How likely would it be for Bolivia (when it had access to the South Pacific Ocean prior to being ceded to Chile) in this scenario to still offer becoming a vassal of a British Brazil in ATL (as was offered to Pedro I IOTL)?

Would say the most feasible "British Brazil" could grow to IMHO at minimum would be a state composed of Rio Grande do Sul and Uruguay within the Uruguay River, up to possibly a state within the Rio Paraná til south of the Tietê River at most.

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Wouldn’t Portugal have tried to kill off the English Brazilian colonies because England was Protestant while Portugal was Catholic and the Catholic Church was pretty intolerant of Protestants at the time? I know there’s the Anglo-Portuguese alliance but still…
 
Wouldn’t Portugal have tried to kill off the English Brazilian colonies because England was Protestant while Portugal was Catholic and the Catholic Church was pretty intolerant of Protestants at the time? I know there’s the Anglo-Portuguese alliance but still…
Why would the English try to colonize Brazil if they are allied with Portugal, anyways? Wouldn't it be easier to just colonize elsewhere, as trying to colonize the same region as an ally would just make them lose a partner?

I guess an English Brazil could be possible with a POD as near as the 15th century, though.
 
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