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  1. United States of the Southern Cone/Estados Unidos del Cono Sur

    I recently came across a thread that discusses an alternate Argentina that doesn't fall victim to post-independence political instability and civil wars the way OTL Argentina did. The thread - along with an accompanying map/chart - can be found at the following link: According to its creator...
  2. make Karaite Judaism as popular as Hasidic Judaism

    What POD would it take to make Karaite Judaism as attractive among the Jewish masses anywhere in the Diaspora in the early Middle Ages (when it first started) as Hasidic Judaism among the Jewish masses in Eastern Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries (when that got its start), such...
  3. British defeat in 1811 invasion of Java

    If the British had lost their 1811 invasion of Java to the Dutch that had already been occupying that and many other islands in the East Indies (present-day Indonesia), what would have happened to the subsequent course of history in Java and in the rest of the East Indies? For example, would...
  4. POD for a more modern/stable, less corrupt Lebanon?

    I've thought of this some more, and a more pointed question might just be: What POD would it take for Lebanon to have a stronger Christian majority from, let's say, the time of independence in 1943 or even before? Maybe lessening Lebanese Christian emigration at one point or another (though such...
  5. POD for a more modern/stable, less corrupt Lebanon?

    Considering that Lebanon - just like Cyprus and Israel - is a small Eastern Mediterranean country with an overall Western outlook (much more than, say, Syria or Egypt or Iraq), and considering that before the outbreak of the civil war in 1975 Lebanon was a pretty modernized country: What would...
  6. British Argentine 19th century

    I see there being a (somewhat) larger Afro-Argentine population in a place like Buenos Aires than IOTL, simply because there's no Paraguayan War (with the British being friendlier to an independent Paraguay than Buenos Aires was IOTL and thus less of a likelihood of Paraguay first shutting...
  7. British Argentine 19th century

    The way I've come to think of it more lately (than when I last wrote), it seems to me that an equivalent of the Underground Railroad heading to Argentina would have been nigh impossible, for two reasons. First of all, the distances between where the bulk of the slaves had been in Brazil (the...
  8. British Argentine 19th century

    I think that Chubut would be the closest to fitting that bill (Welsh basis plus other Celtic and non-Celtic ethnic groups), though even that would just be an Argentine province. No different really from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, which is heavily Scottish-based and is proud of its...
  9. British Argentine 19th century

    It's tempting to say that British Argentina would divert many Irish immigrants from North America due to the large existing Catholic population and British colonial status, but the fact to the matter is that most Irish people went to the United States or Canada because those countries were...
  10. British Argentine 19th century

    I would say that in a British Argentina situation like we're discussing, the Chileans are in a position of weakness relative to the British. Circa the 1830s, the British are able to claim and then take over the Strait of Magellan before the Chileans could, whereas in OTL, the Chileans did it in...
  11. British Argentine 19th century

    Most probably, most of those rump independent territories get eventually annexed by the British and then become part of the Dominion of Argentina, through enticements like rail lines connected to Buenos Aires. Even Cuyo, which had belonged to Chile before 1776. On the other hand, Salta/Jujuy...
  12. British Argentine 19th century

    Controlling the hinterlands of Buenos Aires and of Montevideo would indeed be quite a challenge, which is yet another reason why - shortly after a successful capture of Buenos Aires - it's better for the British to concentrate their military resources on just one area and then to secure it...
  13. British Argentine 19th century

    For starters, when I say "bilingual", I don't necessarily mean that most everyone in those places will speak both languages fluently - it's more like a mosaic of different sociolinguistic groups in the same city (in this case, English and Spanish; in Canada's case, English and French). (Even...
  14. British Argentine 19th century

    At least with regard specifically to white/European immigrants, the local white elites of the dominions didn't care which kind of Europeans (whether British/Irish or Iberian or German or Italian) could immigrate, while the imperial government in London - especially in the early 20th century -...
  15. British Argentine 19th century

    Before I go on any further, bear in mind that what I envision in terms of the overall earlier history of British Argentina is that even though the British temporarily take over the whole River Plate (Rio de la Plata) area after their capture of Buenos Aires in 1807, they let Buenos Aires (city...
  16. British Argentine 19th century

    What would have been of immediate concern to the British immediately after 1807 would not have been all those 500,000-600,000 inhabitants (European and otherwise) of the Argentina area. Rather, it would have been the 30,000 inhabitants of the Banda Oriental (Uruguay) plus the 90,000 inhabitants...
  17. British Argentine 19th century

    Perhaps more diverse than Australia/New Zealand or even Canada, but probably less diverse than South Africa, Guyana, Fiji, Mauritius, etc. Argentina doesn't have nearly enough sugar to attract South Asian indentured servants the way that Natal, Trinidad, Guyana, Mauritius, Fiji, etc. all have...
  18. British Argentine 19th century

    I see a British Argentina as being, on the whole, more like the US/Canada and Australia/New Zealand than like South Africa, the Caribbean colonies, etc. It develops a bilingual/bicultural population like Canada, except that it's Spanish and English instead of French and English. Furthermore, the...
  19. WI Salta/Jujuy in Bolivia, not Argentina?

    They may be among the poorest provinces in Argentina, but I'm not sure if they'd necessarily be the poorest regions of Bolivia, given that Bolivia has a much lower per capita GDP than Argentina. If they were in Bolivia, they might be among the wealthier Bolivian departments, for all I know.
  20. WI Salta/Jujuy in Bolivia, not Argentina?

    You're point, juanml82, is that with the addition of Salta/Jujuy, Bolivia wouldn't have had so much added wealth until at least the mid-to-late 20th century? And thus, the history of Bolivia and of its neighbours - in terms of, for example, the territorial changes as a result of the War of the...
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