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  1. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    It really was wasn't it.
  2. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    The chances of any serious number of Afrika Korps troops getting back is pretty slim in my mind. For a start they have a total distance of 75-80 miles to contend with if they choose the best path and I doubt that will happen. They haven't had the luxury of a force like the LRDG to go and map...
  3. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    Well the fighting in North Africa is likely over then. Yes Rommel got out with some troops but they have been in a hard and costly fight and now they have to make it nearly 100 miles to safety. Not a chance many of them make it, especially those on foot. With the Italians also out of the picture...
  4. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    I got all excited when I saw you had posted. Have to admit I was expecting some actual words and stuff.
  5. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    That's how I look at it. The only two ways It isn't is if Rommel gets a warning and gets out of trouble relatively intact and/or British Logistics aren't up to exploiting a collapse. The second one is highly unlikely IM., This is the same force that just chased the Italians 500 miles across...
  6. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    If the British pull this off things could well be over in north Africa quite soon.
  7. WI: The Somme Offensive was more successful

    No, the time to plan the attack is too long. Everyone is still learning in 1916 and one attack is all that can be managed. The three(ish) Battles in 1917 were already a stretch for Britain. It was only in 1918 did Britain get to the stage where they could quickly decide on, prepare for, plan and...
  8. WI: The Somme Offensive was more successful

    The British started the war thinking the Hurricane Bombardment was the way to go. It was what they used ad Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge in 1915, Neuve Chapelle for instace had a 35 minute bombardment pre attack. The failure of Aubers Ridge in particular led to Britain changing tactics and...
  9. WI: The Somme Offensive was more successful

    I would debate the lesson being that limited offensives were the way to go. For the Somme you have no choice, the tactical maturity isn't their and the lesson up until the Somme was that limited attacks fail. Haig nearly broke the German lines at Loos and had all the troops he finished the...
  10. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    That's the Hispano and I never mentioned that gun. I specifically mentioned Oerlikons that are not only available much earlier, 1935 for the aircraft versions funnily enough. In addition to being available much earlier the Oerlikon is notably lighter than the Hispano, the FFL version being only...
  11. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    If Britain looks like they are on the way to winning in North Africa an interesting butterfly could be some form of Vichy French (as in the Vichy forces in North Africa, not all of Vichy France) action against Libya. Yes it won't be much more than an infantry attack but it will divert resources...
  12. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    That is a very bold claim and one you will have to back up, particularly given the POD gives over 5 years to play with. Given a starting point of 1935 the Hurricane is still 9 months off of flying and the Spitfire is near 21 months away from flying. That is first flight not entering service so...
  13. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    Yeah that's the long and short of it. There were plans for converting the ships to 3 triple 16" like the US did with the North Carolinas but they were never practical, the British needed the ships now. That is also why there were 5 KGV's ordered and not 2, the delay in ordering new guns and...
  14. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    A sub 10000 ton carrier can be cheap though, very cheap and that is something Britain needs. Cheap ways of increasing capability. Closing the Mid Atlantic Gap early can save the British a lot of shipping and that can have a snowballing effect. It should be possible to get a carrier with 24...
  15. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    That's a relatively niche role that I am sure a 20mm Oerlikon could also fulfill whilst also providing better close in AA for the army.
  16. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    RoF difference possibly isn't that wide. Id personally go with the FFS version of the Oerlikon and by 1945 that was capable of around 650rpm. I do admit that weight is an issue with that particular Oerlikon version particularly if you convert to belt feeding. The other option would be the FFL...
  17. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    So some thoughts. For fighter armament .50 cal is pointless. Far better to go for an Oerlikon at some point in quickly after the POD and love it. This has the added advantage of not only being useful against fighters and bombers but also a weapon the Army and Royal Navy can make use of as...
  18. British Rearmament Before World War 2

    That's not entirely true, part of the problem was that the Fleet Air Arm was an RAF formation so the pilots were RAF pilots. The navigators on the other hand were RN crew so their was a desire to keep them so that the RN had some input. Also their was a major shift towards night based operations...
  19. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    The 17 pounder is already under development ITTL. That has been mentioned in story. The requirement that the 17 pounder was designed with can not be met by the 75mm HV as it currently stands. That means the 17 pounder is going to happen. The AP performance of the 75mm HV is sufficiently low at...
  20. Sir John Valentine Carden survives.

    Yes but in terms of the discussion regarding dropping the 17pdr as you have the 75mm it is worth remembering the current capability of the gun and not its possible capability.
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