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  1. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    Oh, there's actually plenty of sites out there, they're just mostly in less developed countries that didn't build loads of hydro in the early 20th century. The big whale is obviously the DRC, given the Inga site's potential (though that would strictly speaking be a run-of-the-river system...it's...
  2. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    That would a run-of-the-river system, and while in the right places those can be very good indeed they are much more susceptible to seasonal fluctuations than reservoir systems and are also far more limited geographically. You can build a reservoir system in many places were a run-of-the-river...
  3. WI Louisiana as a rich state

    Not really. Houston was clearly rising before the 1900 Hurricane, which was more of a nail in the coffin than the actual cause of death. The fundamental issue was and is that Galveston has a rather limited amount of space for further development and that, importantly for the time, Houston was a...
  4. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    For bio-fuels I was thinking more of liquid fuels for vehicles than electricity production--that has certainly grown considerably since the early 1990s, even if you can contest that it does much environmentally. Yes, that's a point that I forgot. Less capital and more expensive capital back...
  5. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    Hydro was pretty played out by 1991, as far as the developed world is concerned, and like nuclear has never quite been considered a "green" technology (in the case of hydro, because of the large reservoirs that it creates and the concomitant destruction of habitats and scenery--it's not for...
  6. AHC: North Secedes from the South

    Delaware was a slave state IOTL, it's just that it was culturally peculiar and didn't act like most of the other slave states.
  7. AHC: No high-speed rail

    But, er, planes did stop going faster. A modern jet airliner is only about as fast as a jet airliner from the 1950s, and even slower than some (to wit the Convair 880/990). It just proved uneconomical and very technically difficult to make them keep going faster, so investment stopped going that...
  8. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    Oh, it flopped, no doubt. I'm perfectly aware of the 2 = 1 rule in Hollywood accounting. I was questioning whether it was a spectacular flop, which I interpret to be a film that makes vastly less than its budget, like 1/5th or 1/10th of the nominal budget.
  9. What does Germanic paganism need to hold back Christianity?

    Well...what do you call Dang Hyang Nirartha except a proselytizer trying to convert the Balians? Certainly his story looks a lot like the classic Christian proselytizer-saint, to the point where he probably would be a saint if everything about him was the same except that he was a Christian...
  10. Development of an Electrical Industrial Revolution

    Hydro is very low tech and would almost certainly be the spearhead of electrical production (as it was IOTL). Wind is higher tech, but probably feasible on a smaller scale early on, only to decline later as generation networks spread and permit access to more reliable power sources (also as IOTL).
  11. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    I wouldn't say that it flopped spectacularly, exactly. It made its budget back (with international sales), which does make it a loss but not a massive one. If it was spectacular it would have gone down like Heaven's Gate with a $3.5 million box office against a $44 million budget or some such...
  12. Make the American Education System more effective (1930-2000)

    The federal district is probably too high a level to be the primary funding source, particularly by 1930 when state dominance of education is long established. You probably could get the states to be the primary funder of schools, however, though even that is a bit tricky. A major issue here is...
  13. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    I concur. Well, that or he scales back his investments and mostly keeps doing it for the PR, kind of like BP did for a while.
  14. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    Gasoline is not literally addictive, unlike the substances you mention. In any case, El Pip obviously did not mean making gasoline and diesel totally illegal, but rather things such as banning certain forms of waste disposal or resource extraction, or regulating higher efficiency for vehicles...
  15. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    The Chinese rare earths processing plants are nasty, indeed, but the pollution they produce is largely localized to their immediate area and downstream areas within China rather than creating systemic effects over the entire world that will last for hundreds of years. Not to mention that oil...
  16. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    Hah hah, very funny. As nice it might be to pretend that it is possible to address human needs and wants with no environmental impacts whatsoever...particularly for people who are already causing a lot of environmental damage and would like to make any alternative look bad so that they don't...
  17. Development of an Electrical Industrial Revolution

    It's unlikely that people will reject centralized power due to "accidents". The issue is that there are significant benefits to scaling up your power station no matter what technology you use, whether that's combustion, hydroelectricity, or even solar or wind power (not that solar is...
  18. A Hippie in the House of Mouse (Jim Henson at Disney, 1980)

    He's going to be in his 80s by the time any Disney Lone Ranger film starts, and probably in poor health (he died at the end of 1999 IOTL). A cameo might be possible, but it might not be, either.
  19. The US air force is not created, the USAAC remains

    Another factor here, which I've mentioned before elsewhere, is that NACA was really laser-focused on aerodynamics throughout the 1920s and 1930s. To be fair, it had rather limited resources, but at the same time that research did a lot for developing better airframe and wing designs that the...
  20. Development of an Electrical Industrial Revolution

    Who is talking about aluminum production? As far as I can tell, everyone, certainly the OP, is mainly talking about substituting electrical power for direct steam power in early industrial facilities and maybe a few unique electrical applications like the telegraph and telephone (or radio). You...
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